Celebrate Women’s History Month all March with JSTOR Daily. The month-long observance in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia recognizes the contributions of women around the world—and throughout history.

We hope you’ll find the stories below, and the scholarship they include in full, a valuable resource for classroom or leisure reading.

Dangerous Librarians

Being a Victorian Librarian Was Oh-So-Dangerous

In the late 19th century, more women were becoming librarians. Experts like Melvil Dewey predicted they would suffer ill health, strain, and breakdowns.
Georgie Hyde-Lees

W. B. Yeats’ Live-in “Spirit Medium”

In the Victorian era, a different kind of ghostwriting became popular—largely because it allowed men to take all the credit.
Rachel Carson Conducts Marine Biology Research with Bob Hines

Rachel Carson’s Critics Called Her a Witch

When Silent Spring was published, the response was overtly gendered. Rachel Carson's critics depicted her as hysterical, mystical, and witchy.
Rosalind Franklin

Seven Beautiful Illustrations of Women Scientists You Should Know

When we talk about inspiring girls to study STEM, do we also consider how important it is to ...
Mug shot taken in 1901 when Goldman was implicated in the assassination of President McKinley

From Enemy to Icon: The Life of Emma Goldman

While alive, Emma Goldman was considered an enemy of the state. In death, she became a celebrated American icon. 
breastfeeding eighteenth century

When Breastfeeding Was a Civic Duty

Think people are judgmental of mothers now? In the 18th- and 19th-centuries, mothers who bottle-fed their babies were blamed for many of society's ills.

Dispatches From the Beginning of Women’s History

The origins of Women's History Month.
Ectoplasm Helen Duncan

Ectoplasm and the Last British Woman Tried for Witchcraft

Spiritualist medium Helen Duncan was photographed emitting ectoplasm, supposedly proof of her ability to contact the dead.
civil rights marcher

Women Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement

Women leaders of the Civil Rights movement worked under the triple constraints of gender, race, and class. Their contribution hasn't gotten its due.
Kimpa Vita and a map of Kongo

Did Kongolese Catholicism Lead to Slave Revolutions?

The legacy of Kimpa Vita, a Kongolese Catholic mystic, was felt from the U.S. to Haiti.
A classroom of white students in the 19th century

White Women’s Role in School Segregation

White American women have long played significant roles in maintaining racist practices. One sociologist calls the phenomenon "social mothering."
Women's March

How Women’s Studies Erased Black Women

The founders of Women’s Studies were overwhelmingly white, and focused on the experiences of white, heterosexual women.
Women's March 1970

The Divide in Feminist Ethics on Mothering

In the 1960s, two groups of feminists had very different views about motherhood. Unsurprisingly, race and family played a role.
Harriet Beecher Stowe George Eliot

When Harriet Beecher Stowe and George Eliot Were Penpals

These 19th-century novelists might seem to have little in common. But for 11 years they wrote each other letters, forging an unusual literary friendship.
women pirates

Women Were Pirates, Too

Maybe you've never heard of Anne Bonny and Mary Read, but they were real-life women pirates who cross-dressed to get on ships.
Judit Polgar Beast Garry Kasparov

Chess Grandmastery: Nature, Gender, and the Genius of Judit Polgár

László Polgár raised all three of his daughters to become chess prodigies.

The Fuss About Josephine Baker

 A new one-woman Broadway show puts Josephine Baker back in the public consciousness.
Poster advertising Joice Heth

The Immortal Life of Joice Heth: How P.T. Barnum Used an Elderly Slave To Launch His Career

P.T. Barnum's career as a Kentucky show man, began with his ownership and exploitation of African American slave Joice Heth.
Urania painting

Before the Civil War, Women Were Welcomed into the Sciences

You know how the story goes. Gender discrimination is baked into science, and women were barred from the ...
Volunteer nurses tending to the sick and wounded.

When Death Was Women’s Business

In the 19th century, women called "watchers" tended to the dying and the dead.
Marianne North, Katherine Routledge and Delia Akeley

3 Women Explorers You Should Know

Their names may not be widely recognized, but these three intrepid women explorers deserved broader acclaim for their accomplishments.
A woman in the kitchen of her mobile home in New Ulm, Minnesota, 1974

Class and the Glass Ceiling

Feminism and "women's work" have looked very different for U.S. women depending on their class.
Susan B. Anthony dollar coin

The Feminist History of Prohibition

A look at the feminist roots of the temperance movement.
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