Jackie Ormes

The Groundbreaking Work of Jackie Ormes

The first Black woman to have a regularly published comic strip, Ormes gave form to the political and social concerns of Black Americans.
The cover of Ebony and Topaz: A Collectanea

The Short but Influential Run of Ebony and Topaz

The 1927 art and literature magazine only ran for a single issue, but “proved an integral component of Harlem Renaissance cultural production."
A Happy Christmastide

Share These Victorian Holiday Cards

It's all birds and flowers and kittens in these greeting cards. May they, as one of the cards says, keep winter from your heart.
Mario Montez

How Latin Camp Rocked the New York Underground

Puerto Rican queers produced theater and film that made them mainstays of the New York underground arts movement of the 1950s and ’60s.
A reliquary shrine attributed to Jean de Touyl, ca. 1325-50

What’s in the Box? The Art of Reliquaries

The cult of relics dates back to the second and third centuries, when Christian martyrs were often killed in ways that fragmented the body.
Source: https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.27117878

A Very JSTOR Daily Costume Guide

Get inspired for Halloween with these hand-curated historical images from JSTOR's Open Community Collections!
Photograph: Two people dancing, photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College. Part of Albright College's Nicaragua Revolution: David Schwartz Collection

Source: https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.20472290

Eight Open Collections Perfect for Hispanic Heritage Month

Freely available images and other primary source materials from the JSTOR Open Community Collections and Artstor Public Collections.
Sample of Perkin's Mauve

The Accidental Invention of the Color Mauve

Or, better dyeing through chemistry.

Wood: The Best “New” Building Material?

A 2017 study for an 80-story wooden structure in Chicago was an opportunity to examine the potential for the building material's future.
From Home Suggestions, 1921

How American Consumers Embraced Color

Vivid hues in everyday products became eye-popping reality in the early twentieth century.