Part of a painting by Paul Sandby of Reading Abbey Gateway

The Reading Abbey Girls’ School

This all-girls boarding school in England produced a generation of accomplished female writers in the eighteenth century.
A dead whale being cleaned by whalers

So You Plan to Teach Moby Dick

The study of Melville’s novel is enhanced by contextualizing it with primary and secondary sources related to the American sperm whaling industry.
A birthday cake on a pastel background

Today: The Best Day of the Year to be Born

Children who are oldest in their class—those born in early autumn—enjoy both a physical and an academic advantage.
A student studying in her dorm

Back to School

Stories from JSTOR Daily about education, libraries, learning, and student life.
Three women and five men gathered in a room which opens up to classical architecture, the group on the left is making music while the others are engaged in conversation; representing the continent of Europe.

Musical Myth-Busting: Teaching Music History with JSTOR Daily

Harnessing the power of quirk to engage students and inspire research in an online learning environment.
Protestors raise their fists as they take to the streets during a mass demonstration against New York State abortion laws, in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, 28th March 1970

Medical Mutual Aid Before Roe v. Wade

In 1968, a group of Boston University students published a handbook about abortion and birth control for their peers. Over half a million copies were distributed.
Alpha Pi Omega in UNC's Yackety Yack, 2003

Inside the First Indigenous Sorority

Alpha Pi Omega, the first historically Native American sorority, supports Native students and creates cultural space for them on university campuses.
The Last Class

The Last Class, 28 Years Later

What happened to the last of the Pell Grant-funded prison higher ed graduates and their paralegal skills? Open Campus's Charlotte West and Angolite associate editor John Corley report.
From the cover of a teacher's book on geography

Teaching Citizenship in the Falling Ottoman Empire

In the nineteenth century, the state used a new education system to shape young citizens' attitudes toward a shrinking empire and the emerging Republic.
From an interview with Eliza Hixon

Angela Proctor on the “Opinions Regarding Slavery: Slave Narratives” Collection

We spoke with Angela Proctor, head archivist at Southern University, about the collections of slave narratives compiled by John B. Cade from 1929-1935.