Plant of the Month: The Pawpaw

The pawpaw is finding champions again after colonizers' dismissal, increasing globalization and economic needs.
Whole Foods organic products

How the “Organic” Label Leaves Small Farmers Out

The USDA's requirements for organic labeling make it easier for large agri-business than the smaller farmers you'd think of as "organic."
A campaigner gives a leaflet to a woman at the Abortion Travel agency store on April 10, 2014 in Madrid, Spain.

Evading Abortion Bans with Mutual Aid

One scholar chronicles how communities have banded together to help each other with abortion care even when it’s against the law.
Scenic View Of Wind Turbines Against Sky During Sunset

How Wind Energy Could Affect Marine Ecosystems

As giant turbines pop up offshore, changes to underwater habitat and sediment will come, too.
Exploring Biology by Ella Thea Smith

The Hidden History of Biology Textbooks 

American biology textbooks supposedly became less scientific after the Scopes trial. One scholar argues that this isn't the whole story.
Euhadra snails mating

The Surprisingly Egalitarian Love Lives of Dart-Inseminating Garden Snails

Mating snails shoot each other with sperm barbs—but very nicely.
Salmo trutta (Brown trout)

To Study Today’s Ecosystems, Look to History

An unlikely source of data about the decline of trout in modern Spain: a book from the 1850s.
A rather reluctant-looking girl is given an injection of vaccine

What Makes Vaccine Mandates Legal?

Historically, the Supreme Court has held that forgoing vaccines is a threat to public health and therefore beyond the bounds of liberty.
tree with a growing cacao beans on the branches

Will Chocolate Survive Climate Change? Actually, Maybe

The forecast has been bad for domesticated cacao. But some environments in Peru might hold the key to the future of the world's sweet tooth.
Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_183-1984-0216-004,_VEB_Elektronik_Gera,_Ingenieure.jpg

How Computer Science Became a Boys’ Club

Women were the first computer programmers. How, then, did programming become the domain of bearded nerds and manly individualists?