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Farah Mohammed

Farahnaz Mohammed is a nomadic journalist, based wherever there’s an internet connection. Her writing has appeared in The Huffington Post, The Guardian, The Women’s Media Center and others, and her work has been referenced by Quartz, The Washington Post and El Colombiano. Farah holds a Masters of Science in Journalism from Northwestern University and a Masters in Spanish and English Literature from The University of Edinburgh. You can find her on twitter @FarahColette, or at www.farahmohammed.com.

A woman wearing a non-existent dress

How Much Would You Pay for a Nonexistent Dress?

Not too long ago, digital-only clothing might have been decried as a scam. But our "extended selves" are increasingly invested in virtual goods.
A Little White Wedding Chapel, Las Vegas

The Decline of the Vegas Wedding

The Little White Wedding Chapel's changing fortunes are emblematic of the state of matrimony and romance.
A box for a 23andMe test kit

The Woman Scholar Who Foresaw the Dangers of DNA Testing

In 2003, Christine Rosen wrote that "[w]e may come to know too much about ourselves to truly live in freedom."
People protest a ban against masks

Why Do Governments Target Protest Masks?

The galvanizing power of the ideology behind a protest mask is a palpable thing.
Succession

The Allure of the Millionaire Family Drama

The reason we put aside our personal dislike of rich TV families, people we might deeply resent if they were real, is two-fold.
A red drink in a glass with a metal straw

The Old New Trend of Sober Curiosity

Abstaining from alcohol is a new trend with a long, long history.
A Mission STS-116 spacewalk

Is Space Too Crowded for NASA?

NASA's retirement of the space shuttle, along with the increase of commercial space firms, have ushered in a second space age. Is NASA still relevant?
Robotic Arm Holding Blue Felt Tip Pen

Can Artificial Intelligence Be Creative?

Machines can write compelling ad copy and solve complex "real life" problems. Should the creative class be worried?
A woman putting a piece of Ikea furniture together

Why We Pay To Do Stuff Ourselves

Why do people love IKEA furniture, cake mixes, and apple-picking? Psychology.
Caretaker embracing senior man at home

Paying for Love in the Caring Economy

Is it terrible to have to pay someone to care for your loved ones? Or could it actually be an effective way to establish a high standard of care?
Glass bottles for snake oil and memory elixir

There Will Always Be a Market for Snake Oil

Even when we suspect the underlying root of an issue is complex, we tend to look for a quick fix.
A Bunch of Bucking Broncho Busters, 1898

The Downfall of the American Cowboy

As the need for ranch workers has dwindled, the iconic status of cowboys has continued to grow.
A wall of security cameras in Toronto, Canada

Are Smart Cities a Wise Idea?

When Google runs a smart city, who owns the data?
Presidents Tyler, Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Arthur, Theodore Roosevelt, Coolidge, Truman, Lyndon Johnson, and Ford

The Accidental Presidents of the United States

How "accidental" world leaders have faced the challenges of leading major democracies without being voted in.
Illustration of a man lying on a couch

Workplace Burnout is Nothing New

Doctors were talking about the dangers of chronic stress, exhaustion, and anxiety back in 1909, predicting dire consequences if the symptoms were ignored.
Several slinkys, with one that stands out in the middle

How to Cure Groupthink

"Groupthink" describes the systematic errors groups can make when facing important collective decisions. How can it be avoided?
A Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP) California sea lion waits for his handler to give the command to search the pier for potential threats during International Mine Countermeasures Exercise (IMCMEX in Manama, Bahrain

Navy Seals: Why the Military Uses Marine Mammals

A beluga whale was suspected to be a spy. It's not as outlandish as it may seem.
The Leader of the Luddites

Why Luddites Are Fashionable Again

Today we call anyone with a flip phone a Luddite. But the term has radical origins.
A group of business people chasing a dollar on a string

When Big Rewards Don’t Pay Off

One would think that offering potentially big rewards would inspire workers to create better work. A study found a more complicated picture.
A woman at a table being interviewed for a job

The Only Fair Job Interview

Could taking some of the human element out of interviewing actually make the process more just?
The Procession of the Trojan Horse in Troy by Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo

Greek Gods and Game Theory

Game theory is the study of mathematical models of strategic interaction. Connecting it with famous stories makes it easier for students to grasp.
A television with an image of the earth from space, in front of a green plant background

What’s Wrong with Planet Earth?

According to one critic, the BBC documentary inspired more appreciation for HD television than it did for engaged environmentalism.
A child sitting in front of a window on a bed

Was the One-Child Policy Ever a Good Idea?

China's "one-child" policy has been relaxed, and now married couples may have two children. But according to scholars, the damage is already done.
Hand with Skull Shaped Pill

Why Companies Swallow Poison Pills

Faced with a potential hostile takeover, companies may deploy a dramatic shareholder rights plan, colloquially known as a "poison pill."
Lewis & Clark with Sacagawea

How Sacagawea Became More Than A Footnote

A suffragist searching for a heroine found Sacagawea and lifted her out of historical obscurity.