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Farah Mohammed

Farahnaz Mohammed is a nomadic journalist, based wherever there’s an internet connection. Her writing has appeared in The Huffington Post, The Guardian, The Women’s Media Center and others, and her work has been referenced by Quartz, The Washington Post and El Colombiano. Farah holds a Masters of Science in Journalism from Northwestern University and a Masters in Spanish and English Literature from The University of Edinburgh. You can find her on twitter @FarahColette, or at www.farahmohammed.com.

Virgin Islands hurricane damage

After the Hurricanes, Who Cleans Up The Caribbean?

The Caribbean islands' plights have been reminders that despite their small size, overseas territories can be a big responsibility for governments abroad.
Bangalore street

Are There Other Silicon Valleys?

The phrase "Silicon Valley" conjures images of a crowded mini-metropolis in California, and a barrage of familiar Western brands. That's about to change.
Siri settings

An App for Autism

For some families, Apple's assistant Siri has become a crucial bridge between their autistic children and the outside world.
Padlock laptop

The New Censorship

Americans will rail against the government at First Amendment infringements. But the government isn't the only entity that can censor speech or ideas.
Macron, Trudeau, Trump

How Charisma Makes Leaders Great

It's easy to write off charisma as a superficial quality. Yet, studies have proven that charisma is in fact an integral element of good leadership.
Juicero patent

The Most Important Rule for Startup Success

Startups often don't play by the rules. But a wifi-enabled juicer may have been "trying to solve a problem that didn't exist."
Cairo street scene

Is it Smart To Cut Foreign Aid Because of Human Rights Abuses?

Recently, the US denied Egypt nearly $96 million in international aid, as chastisement for the country's abysmal human rights record.
Nogales Arizona Mexico

The Case for Open Borders

Is a world without borders an idea so crazy it just might work? Scholars weigh in on how open borders might solve the world's immigration problem.
Unite the Right rally

Is Doxxing the Right Way to Fight the “Alt-Right?”

In the aftermath of Charlottesville, people with similar names to white supremacists involved in the march were also caught in the crossfire.
Refugee Dress

Is “Political” the New Black?

Clothing as a tool in social change isn't anything new, but is a for-profit industry that thrives on exclusivity too removed to comment on politics?
Student homelessness

Tackling Student Homelessness

College students are notoriously strapped for cash. For some, however, that youthful poverty becomes actual homelessness.
Male tennis player lying on ground

Failure Has Always Been a Key to Success

Failure is in fashion, but this isn't some new passing trend. How universities and the medical profession have embraced the idea of "failing better."
SOS Venezuela Protest

What Venezuela Can Teach Us About Saving Failed States

Outside intervention in Venezuela is built on the idea that the fallout of a failed state has ramifications beyond its national borders.
Tiny A-Frame House

Is “Tiny Living” Really The Answer?

One response to the "bigger is better" trend has been the rise of microhomes: hyper-fashionable domiciles around 40 square meters in size.
Businesswoman interview

The Gender Gap Is Even More Insidious Than You Thought

Women are more likely to be excluded from key networks, less likely to have had managerial experience, and have fewer mentors to signpost the way forward.
Young Egyptian protesters

Could Youth Unemployment in the Middle East Be Dangerous?

Nearly half the population in the Middle East is under 25 years old, and their unemployment rate hovers at a staggering 30%.
Everest basecamp

Mountain of Trash: Everest’s Environmental Disaster

Recently, the mountaineering community has been abuzz with the news that Mount Everest’s eponymous Hillary Step may have ...
Citizenship ceremony

Should Citizenship Be For Sale?

Should you be able to buy your way to citizenship? Economic research reveals some merits behind the idea, but others see classism and discrimination.
Rosie the Riveter

How Conflict Boosts the Economy

Historically speaking, we are living in unusually peaceful times. But does peacetime mean bad things for the economy, which is often boosted by war?
man in garden on laptop

Secret Communities: Why We Confess Online

How can it be helpful to disclose secrets online? A look at sites like PostSecret, where users anonymously confess to things they've never told anyone.
Private Prisons

The Problem With Privatizing Prisons

If private prisons make their profit from criminal society, its goes against business sense to reduce criminality.
grief app

Grief? There’s an App for That.

Would you want to be able to talk to a loved one after they'd passed away, knowing it wasn't really them? Would it help? Would it hurt?
stack of books in home interior

Why You Love the Smell of Old Books

Scent carries significant psychological meaning. A recent paper proposed that scent be included in a proposed intangible heritage list recognized by UNESCO.
American Psycho CEOs

Do Psychopaths Really Make Good CEOs?

It's a well known trope: the powerful, high-earning businessman with the pathologically low levels of empathy. But do psychopaths make good CEOs?
A row of empty office cubicles.

“Deaths of Despair”: What’s Really Killing Americans

Why a large swath of middle-aged, middle-class white Americans, especially those with lower levels of education, are dying more "deaths of despair."