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Farah Mohammed

Farahnaz Mohammed is a nomadic journalist, based wherever there’s an internet connection. Her writing has appeared in The Huffington Post, The Guardian, The Women’s Media Center and others, and her work has been referenced by Quartz, The Washington Post and El Colombiano. Farah holds a Masters of Science in Journalism from Northwestern University and a Masters in Spanish and English Literature from The University of Edinburgh. You can find her on twitter @FarahColette, or at www.farahmohammed.com.

Oprah and Obamas

How Oprah Became a Cultural Icon

The idea of a President Oprah has sparked excitement rather than ridicule. Americans value symbolism as much as political experience; while Oprah has little of the latter, she is practically made of the former.
fortune teller's hands

Why Economists Make Terrible Fortunetellers

Even the (presumably rational) economists of the world love to try to predict the future. They often get it wrong, suggesting that all the rational data in the world is rendered useless by the irrationality of human behavior.
Facebook on smartphone

Why Facebook Can Be Good For Your Health

Is Facebook bad for your mental health? Researchers have been studying the profound impact social bonds can have on health since the 1970s.
data mining

Testing Americans’ Tolerance for Surveillance

What would have been considered a dystopian level of surveillance a mere twenty years ago has now become the norm. Why don't internet users care?
Cropped shot of a woman using her laptop on a wooden table

The Rise and Fall of the Blog

A quick Google search will yield suggested results, 'are blogs still relevant 2016', 'are blogs still relevant 2017'' 'is blogging dead'.
Banksy hotel room

Should Banksy be on the West Bank?

Who is Bansky better serving with his artwork in Gaza? Those living on the bank itself or his personal brand?
colorful pills on black background

Paying People to Take Their Pills

The majority of medication-related hospital admissions were caused by noncompliance—when patients, for one reason or another, don't take their drugs.
Starbucks drinks

Why Brands Want To Be Your BFF

Most contemporary consumers consider ourselves too savvy to be taken in by a corporation’s attempts to integrate seamlessly ...
Bride alone on couch

Why Pay the Costs of a Wedding for One?

Self-marriage may be, at least in some cases, a ritual reclaiming a sense of control when women may have felt they've lost it.
Tokyo commuters

Japan’s Solution to Loneliness: Virtual Wives

Japan has always been at the forefront of technological advancement. With a lonely and over-taxed workforce, the country has now introduced the robot wife.
Pixel Buds Google

Why You Still Should Learn a Language in the Age of Pixel Buds

Google's Pixel Buds aim to translate from language to language in real time. Will this eliminate the need for human translators?
mother and kids taking selfie stick picture in Europe

Instagram, YouTube, and the New Child Stars

The term 'child star' is almost synonymous with dysfunction. We're familiar with TV and movie kids, but what about those made famous by social media?
Close-up of colourful tulip flowers

What Do Bitcoin and Tulips Have In Common?

What can we learn from the extraordinary period in Holland's history when a surge in demand for tulip bulbs pushed the price up to exorbitant rates?
Virgin Islands hurricane damage

After the Hurricanes, Who Cleans Up The Caribbean?

The Caribbean islands' plights have been reminders that despite their small size, overseas territories can be a big responsibility for governments abroad.
Bangalore street

Are There Other Silicon Valleys?

The phrase "Silicon Valley" conjures images of a crowded mini-metropolis in California, and a barrage of familiar Western brands. That's about to change.
Siri settings

An App for Autism

For some families, Apple's assistant Siri has become a crucial bridge between their autistic children and the outside world.
Padlock laptop

The New Censorship

Americans will rail against the government at First Amendment infringements. But the government isn't the only entity that can censor speech or ideas.
Macron, Trudeau, Trump

How Charisma Makes Leaders Great

It's easy to write off charisma as a superficial quality. Yet, studies have proven that charisma is in fact an integral element of good leadership.
Juicero patent

The Most Important Rule for Startup Success

Startups often don't play by the rules. But a wifi-enabled juicer may have been "trying to solve a problem that didn't exist."
Cairo street scene

Is it Smart To Cut Foreign Aid Because of Human Rights Abuses?

Recently, the US denied Egypt nearly $96 million in international aid, as chastisement for the country's abysmal human rights record.
Nogales Arizona Mexico

The Case for Open Borders

Is a world without borders an idea so crazy it just might work? Scholars weigh in on how open borders might solve the world's immigration problem.
Unite the Right rally

Is Doxxing the Right Way to Fight the “Alt-Right?”

In the aftermath of Charlottesville, people with similar names to white supremacists involved in the march were also caught in the crossfire.
Refugee Dress

Is “Political” the New Black?

Clothing as a tool in social change isn't anything new, but is a for-profit industry that thrives on exclusivity too removed to comment on politics?
Student homelessness

Tackling Student Homelessness

College students are notoriously strapped for cash. For some, however, that youthful poverty becomes actual homelessness.
Male tennis player lying on ground

Failure Has Always Been a Key to Success

Failure is in fashion, but this isn't some new passing trend. How universities and the medical profession have embraced the idea of "failing better."