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Olivia Box

Olivia Box

Olivia is a writer, beekeeper, and an ecologist. Currently, she is a graduate student at the University of Vermont where she is studying forests threatened by climate change and invasive pests. Her freelance work has been featured in Northern Woodlands, Massive Science, and The Counter. You can follow her work at  @oliviafaybox or see her complete portfolio here.
tree bark

Tree Bark and Fire

A tree's hard outer bark helps it survive. Studying why it's thicker on some trees than others could help scientists understand how to protect them.
Poison ivy

With Climate Change, Poison Ivy May Get Itchier

Bad news for the estimated 80 percent of the human population that's allergic to the dreaded—and abundant—leaves of three.
Tree Rings of a Stump

How Tree Ring Records Can Help Predict Droughts

Inside the trunks of trees lies a wealth of data on climate that goes back generations.
Cattle in a forest

Silvopasture; Or, Why Are There Cows in the Woods?

Cattle grazing on invasive plants in longleaf pine forests could benefit ecosystems and farmers alike.
Dried flowers

Which Flowers Bloom First and Why?

A massive collection of dried flower specimens demonstrates that climate change disrupts the timing of spring blooms.
Small white flowers bloom on the end of a cherry tree branch near the base of the Washington Monument in Washington, DC.

Is Your Favorite Tree an Invasive Species?

Some superstar trees in the US are actually invasive to their ecosystems. Blossoming cherry trees, for example.
A dead tree in a forest

What Happens to a Tree When It Dies?

Decomposing trees on the forest floor become "dead wood"—a part of ecosystems that researchers are only beginning to understand.
Swimming beaver (Castor fiber)

A Comeback for Beavers?

As two researchers found out, rewilding a species can be done in different ways, sometimes with different outcomes.
Lodge-pole pines c. 1857

Good News for the Lodgepole Pine!

The long-lived species' survivor genes are dispersed from the Yukon to southern California, meaning that it has a good chance of weathering climate change.