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Angela Chen

Angela Chen is a journalist specializing in coverage of economics, bioethics, mental health, and asexuality. Her work has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, Chronicle of Higher Education, Pacific Standard, The Rumpus, San Diego Union-Tribune, and other publications. She is an editor at The Morning News and has also worked for Guernica Magazine and The New Inquiry. She is on Twitter (@chengela).

October 15, 2009: Viagra and Norlevo tablets in window display of a a pharmacy in Kas, Turkey. Viagra is made by Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and the trade name for the drug sildenafil citrate. It is the prime treatment for erectile dysfunction. It was developed 1998 by british scientists for treating pulmonary arterial hypertension. Norlevo is a hormonal contraceptive.

Covering Viagra, But Not Birth Control?

The different ways insurance companies treat Viagra for men and birth control for women show the inherent sexism and legal biases involved. 

How Schools Can Better Protect Athletes Suffering From Concussions

An estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur in the U.S. annually. Here are some tips schools can use to minimize its impact on students. 
Margarine

Is Margarine Dead?

Though margarine may be in decline, its rise was met with strong adversity throughout the 20th century. 
Gladyes Williamson holds up a discolored jug of water and chants along with other protestors outside the Farmers Market downtown on April 25, 2015, which marks the one year anniversary of the City of Flint switching from using Detroit water to Flint River water. Flint residents of all ages gathered outside Flint City Hall, located on S. Saginaw Street, with signs, t-shirts, and megaphones before walking throughout many streets downtown to voice their concerns with the public. (Sam Owens/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP)

Should the EPA Be Blamed For the Crisis in Flint?

The EPA has claimed no wrongdoing in the crisis in Flint. Should they have?

How The New Republic Tried to Find Its Audience

In its early days, The New Republic tried many creative ways to rejuvenate its waning readership. Some were more successful than others. 
Heroin use.

What Causes an Epidemic of Heroin Deaths?

Research suggests that certain things such as alcohol and the potency of the dose increase the rate at which users die from heroin use. 
Kim Jong Un

North Korea’s Fight To Go Nuclear

North Korea has for decades tried to acquire nuclear technology, but international reluctance and a lack of resources have been their greatest obstacles. 
Glenn Frey, Alan Rickman and David Bowie

We’re More Sensitive to Our Health After a Celebrity Dies

Data suggests that people are more sensitive to health-related matters after the death of a celebrity. 
Sandra Bland via Facebook

Why is Perjury So Rarely Prosecuted?

Perjury is often considered the "forgotten offense." Despite being widespread, it is rarely prosecuted. 
UN Climate Change Conference COP21 in Paris on 30 November 2015. From left to the right: Enrique Peña Nieto, François Hollande, Angela Merkel and Michelle Bachelet.

How We Perceive Climate Change: A Global Analysis

A country to country analysis of how global populations perceive the threat of climate change.
Historical Rainfall and Temperature Charts Engraving

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever

Early meteorology helped farmers predict yield, transforming the agricultural industry.
Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015, following oral arguments in the Supreme Court in a case that could cut back on or even eliminate affirmative action in higher education. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The Case for Abigail Fisher: A History of Affirmative-Action Cases

Three affirmative-action cases set precedent for the Supreme Court as they make a decision on Fisher vs. University of Texas.
Mark Zuckerberg

Philanthropic Billionaires: An Investigation

Mark Zuckerberg joins a long line of philanthropic billionaires who have pledged millions of dollars to charitable causes.
Cover art for the album 25 by artist Adele © Adele/Facebook

Does Vocal Talent Translate into Album Sales?

The correlation between vocal talent and album sales is a telling indicator of what consumers want.
Pink out for Planned Parenthood

Do Laws Protect Abortion Clinics From Violence?

The research surveys whether state laws protecting abortion clinics have deterred pro-life activists from committing acts of violence.
North Dakota Fighting Sioux Logo

The Fight to Remove American Indian Mascots

The fight to remove American Indian mascots from universities and professional sports programs.
Smiling waitress making minimum wage.

How Easy is it for Minimum-Wage Workers to Get a Raise?

The minimum-wage debate has been a long point of interest for business owners and labor economists.
Lincoln University graduate Lloyd L. Gaines, 24 years old, during the mandamus suit trial in which he is seeking to compel the University of Missouri to admit him as a law student. (Copyright Bettmann/Corbis / AP Images)

Desegregating Mizzou

It took twelve years and the Supreme Court before the University of Missouri agreed to accept black students.
Volkswagen T6 Caravelle

Beyond the Volkswagen Scandal: What Our Choices Say About Us

Can Volkswagen repair public trust after the scandal? Here's a historical look at the brand-identification associated with the company.
Photo of Carmen Miranda published by the New York Sunday News in 1943.

From Vaudeville to Hamilton: Racial Minorities in Musicals

Hamilton, the Lin-Manuel Miranda play, is taking Broadway by storm. Its use of a "race-blind" cast has been unprecedented in modern theater.
Children at preschool playing with colorful shapes.

Does Universal Pre-K Help Working Mothers?

Pre-K may help the child, but does it get mothers back to work?
Sweden-Nobel prize-China-Tu Youyou
Xinhua via Getty Images

Why Hasn’t China Won a Nobel in Science Until Now?

Despite a long tradition of scientific inquiry and study, no Chinese scientist has won the coveted Nobel Prize. Until now. We try to understand why.
Licensed under Public Domain via <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chinese_American_Fishermen_b.jpg#/media/File:Chinese_American_Fishermen_b.jpg" target="_blank">Commons</a>

The Making of Asian America

Asians are on track to become the fastest growing U.S. population by the next half-century. We look at the history of Asian immigration, past and present.
Death Penalty Jail Cells

How and Why Public Opinion on the Death Penalty Changed

A look at the American public's ambivalent opinion of the death penalty.