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James MacDonald

James MacDonald received a BS in Environmental Biology from Columbia and a PhD in Ecology and Evolution from Rutgers University, spending 4 years in Central America collecting data on fish in mangrove forests. His research has been published in scholarly journals such as Estuaries and Coasts and Biological Invasions. He currently works in fisheries management and outreach in New York.

Kicking Back, Gladiator Style

Gladiators drank a concoction of vinegar and ashes to stay bulky for battle.

A New Species of Frog Sings in New York City

A new species of frog has been identified in the wilds of New York City

How to Catch a Comet

Last week, the European Space Agency (ESA) successfully landed an unmanned probe (Philae) on a comet, a feat heretofore unmatched in human history

EPA Announces 2014 Presidential Green Chemistry Award Winners

The 2014 Presidential Green Chemistry Award winners discover new strategies for pollution prevention.

Humans and Neanderthals: History Revealed in an Ancient Femur

Recent findings narrow the period in which both Neanderthals and modern humans existed together.

The Secret Lives of Giraffes

Despite being such conspicuous animals, researchers still know surprisingly little about giraffes.

Why Isn’t Anyone Talking About Ocean Acidification?

Will ocean acidification disrupt the planet's ecosystem before climate change does?

Climate and Gender: Too Few Males?

Could climate change lead to fewer males?

Embryonic Stem Cells Finally Start to Deliver

The early promise of stem cells might finally be overcoming controversy and paying off.

Deinocheirus: At Long Last, Arms with a Body to Match

The mysterious Deinocheirus dinosaur now has a body.

Singing’s Not Just for the Birds Anymore

The common perception of bat calls consists of squeaks and chirps. But many bats, including Mexican free-tailed bats of Austin, TX, sing to one another.

Signs of Recovery in Earth’s Ozone Layer, but Danger Remains

For the first time in 35 years, atmospheric ozone actually increased, according to NASA measurements.

Anthrax: The Bacteria that Lays Diabolical Traps

Anthrax sets self-perpetuating booby traps in order to spread itself, researchers have found.

How Smart are Dolphins, Really?

Dolphins may not be as smart as previously believed.

The Cassini Saturn Mission and the Allure of the Unknown

What the Cassini Saturn Mission teaches us about scientific discovery

For the Next Generation in Solar Power, Talk to the Clam

The next generation of solar power might be waiting beneath the Pacific waves, in the form of an armchair-sized clam.

Man with Turtles in his Pants is the Tip of the Iceberg

Xu Gai was caught trying to enter Canada with 51 turtles crammed into his pants.

Sea Monkeys Make the Ocean Go ‘Round

Turns out ocean currents might be created by…sea monkeys? Seriously.

Indian Leopards Living High on the Dog

Unbeknownst to unsuspecting residents, a large number of leopards are prowling the fields and backyards of populated agricultural lands in India. 

Recession Lessons from an Ancient Fossil Bed

In a 120-million-year-old rock in Northeast China, paleontologists made a remarkable find.

Infection Control 600 Years Before the CDC

Modern health authorities combating the Ebola virus in West Africa might look to medieval infection control for inspiration.

Happy 100th Birthday to the Journal of Parasitology!

This year, the Journal of Parasitology celebrates its 100th anniversary

Why We Really, Really Hate Being Alone

Why do we hate to be alone? It may have to do with saber toothed tigers.

New Organism Might Represent One of Life’s Earliest Forms

Dendrogramma enigmatica, an organism discovered in the 1980s, may be one of the earliest lifeforms.

Train Your Brain to Prefer Healthy Food?

Researchers in Boston found that it may be possible to train the brain to unconsciously prefer healthier, more nutritious foods.