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Juliet Lamb

Juliet Lamb is a wildlife biologist specializing in seabird ecology. She has worked on research projects throughout the United States and in Scotland, Panama, and Ecuador, where she’s studied species ranging from elk to Harpy eagles. Her current research is on the breeding and migratory biology of Brown Pelicans in the Gulf of Mexico.

sargassum seaweed dumped on beach

The Great Seaweed Invasion

In the Caribbean, sargassum deposits have grown to unprecedented sizes, obscuring the sand and turning nearshore waters into seething sargassum soup.
Jellyfish bloom

The Global Jellyfish Crisis in Perspective

Are the increasing jellyfish blooms in our oceans the result of global temperature changes?
Blackfoot Albatross chick

The Strange Tale of the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program

In the 1960s, over seventy scientists and graduate students traveled to U.S. outlying islands as part of the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program.

Why Do Pandas Have Thumbs?

Some panda species have strange thumb-like appendages, but their thumbs evolved for strikingly different reasons.
Bioluminescent ocean

The Glowing Mystery of Bioluminescence

Bioluminescence, an animal's ability to create and use light, exists exclusively in the lower branches of the tree of life.
Moving Forest

The Incredible Moving Forest

For as long as plants have existed, there have been moving forests, migrating across the earth’s surface in response to changes in the climate.
Two Hummingbirds and an Orchid

Are There “Transgender” Proclivities in Animals?

We tend to think of gender expression as uniquely human. But many species gain advantages by projecting an opposite-sex appearance.

The Curious Science of Animal Personalities

Any pet owner can tell you that different pets have different personalities, but actually measuring personality in non-human animals is a challenge.
Welikia Manhattan map

What Did Manhattan Look Like in 1609?

The Welikia Project recreates a lost vision of Manhattan, one composed of marshes and forest surrounded by wide, meandering rivers.
Sleeping dog

Extreme Napping in the Animal Kingdom

Although sleep is ubiquitous for animals with brains, differences in how, why, and for how long animals sleep remain unexplained.
American Bison

The Bison Is America’s New National Mammal

The American bison joins the bald eagle as the second national animal. What will the designation mean for its conservation status?
altruistic marmot

Why Do Animals Share?

Natural selection should weed out the do-gooders and leave only egoists, but animals share just the same.

Can You Hear It? The Cicadas Are Back

After 17 years quietly developing under the soil, 3 species of periodical cicadas emerged this summer. How do these insects coordinate?

No, Trophy Hunting Won’t Protect Wildlife

Killing wildlife to save it isn't a viable strategy. We can create diverse, self-sustaining ecosystems without trophy hunting.
European Starlings

What If We Had All the Birds from Shakespeare in Central Park?

According to birding lore, two of America's most invasive bird species were introduced by a misguided Shakespeare fan named Eugene Schieffelin.
Science jars of formalin and fish

What Lies Beneath the Museum?

Paradoxically, museum specimens of long-dead animals may offer us the keys to protecting live ones.

Uptown Fox: On Wildlife in Cities

Urban environments are harsh, with only fragmentary remains of natural habitat. But human activity has driven a rise of wildlife in cities.
Wildlife cams

Why We Can’t Turn Away from Wildlife Cams

Wildlife cams have steadily gained popularity among both scientists and casual observers. But viewers aren't always prepared for wildlife unscripted.
Elk in Yellowstone National Park

National Parks Are Like Islands for Wildlife

There’s no doubt that national parks are good at getting people in touch with the natural world. But how good are they at conserving wildlife?
Flying Penguin

Zoological Jokes and Hoaxes

The humor in inventing fake animals comes from the fact that the audience is in on the joke. Nevertheless, the line between satire and hoax can be fuzzy.
Camouflage

Teddy Roosevelt Weighs in on the Evolution of Camouflage

In the years after his presidency, Roosevelt sent a letter to The Condor magazine criticizing painter Abbott Thayer's theory of animal camouflage.
Puffins

Lessons in Senescence: Not All Animals Age the Same

Senescence--age-related decline in health and reproduction–is something we take for granted in humans, but among animals it’s not necessarily the norm.
Ecoacoustics

Ecoacoustics: The Deafening Silence of Endangered Wildlife

The emerging field of ecoacoustics is the studies how species use sound to coexist and interact across vast areas of land.
National Wildlife Refuge

The History of the National Wildlife Refuge System

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge has been occupied by armed militants since January 2, 2016. But where did the National Wildlife Refuge system come from?
Ghost fishing

“Ghost Fishing” Is Killing Coastal Wildlife

Ghost fishing is the process by which fishing equipment no longer under human control continues to trap and kill wildlife.