The team behind the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration has revealed the first image of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The image shows the massive object at the center of our galaxy, known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A* in astronomers’ shorthand), as a glowing ring of gas around a dark central region (the “shadow”). This view of light being bent by the gravity of a black hole some four million times more massive than our Sun offers the first visual evidence of the suspected nature of Sgr A*.

To mark this incredible achievement, we’re sharing Daily stories about black holes and other amazing moments from the history of astronomy, all based on scholarship freely available from JSTOR.

Black Holes

How to See the Invisible Universe

Telescopes that detect long-wavelength signals offer clues about the Big Bang, the centers of black holes, and the origins of life.
This infographic details the locations of the participating telescopes of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and the Global mm-VLBI Array (GMVA).

Seeing Black Holes

Two of the scientists on the huge team that eventually captured the world's first image of a black hole discuss the particular challenges of the task.
Supermassive black hole

Rotating Black Holes May Serve as Gentle Portals for Hyperspace Travel

Feel like visiting another star system or dimension? You can do this by traveling through a black hole.
Black Hole illustration

What’s On the Other Side of a Black Hole?

What would happen if you entered a black hole?
Black hole is shining bright red light in the distant cosmos

Scientists Discover Largest Black Hole Ever

Scientists recently discovered the largest black hole ever.

The Women Who Make It Happen

Eight Women Astronomers You Should Know

A guided tour of selected luminaries of astronomy, from Ancient Greece to today.
Lick Observatory

The Women Who Made Male Astronomers’ Ambitions Possible

In the late 19th century, Elizabeth Campbell helped her astronomer husband run the Lick Observatory and lead scientific eclipse-viewing expeditions.
Maria Mitchell

America’s First Woman Astronomer

Maria Mitchell became famous when she discovered a comet in 1847. She didn't stop there, fighting for education and equality for women in the sciences.
Harvard Observatory, 1899

How Women Finally Broke Into the Sciences

Women finally broke into the sciences in sex-segregated jobs in the years between 1880 and 1910.
Dorothy Bennett in Peru

The Star-Studded Life of Ms. Dorothy Bennett

The wacky life story of the astronomer, author, children's book publisher, and anthropologist who restored an old barge on the Gowanus Canal in 1937.

Space Science and Other Cool Things

Hayabusa2 Approaches Asteroid Ryugu

Asteroids Are Windows to the Past

Japan’s space agency has landed rovers on Asteroid Ryugu. The photos and samples from the mission will reveal a lot about asteroids.
Neutrino Antarctica

The Mysterious Neutrino

A new discovery puts scientists a bit closer to understanding the mysterious subatomic particle that is the neutrino.
TRAPPIST-1 planet illustration

M-Dwarves and the Search for Life

In recent years, astronomers have broadened their search for habitable planets to include previously ignored stars like M-dwarves.
Haumea, a dwarf planet

The Weirdest Dwarf Planets Discovered So Far

The solar system is apparently more crowded than we thought: astronomers have discovered a new dwarf planet. Some dwarf planets don't play by the rules.

Sending Tiny Robots to the Nearest Star

A group of astrophysicists think they have found a way to send a probe to the newest star system, Alpha Centauri.
Artist's concept of buckyballs and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons around an R Coronae Borealis star rich in hydrogen. Credit: MultiMedia Service (IAC)

What’s between the Stars? Buckyballs!

How buckyballs fit into the formation of new stars.

A Cosmic Mystery from a Microwave Burrito

The source of mysterious radio waves detected by two of world's largest telescopes has been traced to a microwave.

Ole Rømer and the Speed of Light

September marks two significant dates in the early history of astronomy and physics—the birthday of Danish astronomer Ole Rømer ...

Astronomy’s Cultural Impact

An illustration of sunspots from between 1885 and 1890

Do Sunspots Explain Global Recession, War, or Famine?

Maybe it's something about the number eleven?
The Book of Miracles, c. 1550

The Long History of Comet Phobia

Even the invention of the telescope couldn't convince all people to put aside superstitions about comets.

Why Your Zodiac Sign Is Probably Wrong

The science of astronomy is at odds with the basic organizing principle in astrology: the dates of the zodiac.
Mars

Great Scientific Discoveries That Weren’t

Dinosaur DNA! Life on Mars! In the world of science, amazing discoveries don’t quite work out the way the discoverer hopes they will.
Astrolabe

The San Zeno Astrolabe Tracked Time by the Stars

The astrolabe was a revolutionary tool for calculating celestial positions and local time. The device's design dates back to Islamic antiquity.
Victorian eclipse

Solar Eclipse Tourism: The Victorians Were the Pioneers

People have been planning for this month's total solar eclipse for years. They aren't the first to do so: the Victorians pioneered eclipse tourism.
Sirius

What Are the Dog Days of Summer?

The "dog days of summer" are attributed to the rise of Sirius, the Dog Star, but research into the lore suggests another dog entirely.

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