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Lina Zeldovich

Lina Zeldovich

Lina Zeldovich grew up in a family of Russian scientists listening to bedtime stories about volcanoes and black holes. Since then, she has edited science features at the Nautilus Magazine, won two awards for a story about poo, and covered topics ranging from an illegal orca trade in China to a toilet revolution in Madagascar. She holds a master degree from Columbia J-School and has written for Popular Mechanics, Smithsonian, Newsweek, Audubon, Mosaic Science and Hakai Magazine, among other publications.

Gator eating crab

Alligators on Beaches May Become the Norm

As conservation efforts succeed, wolves, leopards, alligators, and other predators colonize new lands.
Early Spider Orchid (Ophrys sphegodes)

Bees’ and Orchids’ Pseudo-Romance Broken by Climate Change

Rising temperatures are upsetting the bee-orchid pollinating schedule, threatening to snuff out the flower.

These Lizard-Dolphin Creatures Ruled the Seas for 150 Million Years

Ichthyosaurs gave birth to live offspring, had huge eyes and lived all over the world.

An Astro-Ecology Team Brings Stellar Software Down to Earth

This new AI will protect endangered species from poachers, says a team of conservationists and astrophysicists.
fast food phthalates

Would You Like Phthalates with That?

People who like dining out have 40 to 55 percent higher phthalate levels than those who eat at home.
Molten lava erupts from Eyjafjallajokull, Fimmvorduhals, Iceland

Volcanoes, Climate Change, and The Birth of Christianity

The massive, deadly eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eldgjá in 10th century brought climate change and Christianity to the island colony.
Husk Power Systems

Running On Rice Husks—How One Entrepreneur Brought Electricity to His Village

In the rural Indian province of Bihar, Husk Power Systems is converting leftover rice husks into biofuel. Now they're building mini-power plants around the country, and expanding into Tanzania.
The English Lake District, a UNESCO World Heritage Site

British National Parks Plug Into the Internet of Things

Researchers in England think connecting British National Parks to the “Internet of Things” could help better protect the national treasures at lower costs with improved experience for nature-lovers.

Converting Tobacco Fields into Solar Farms Can Save Half a Million Lives a Year

The cost of generating solar power has dropped so dramatically, it is now economically advantageous for tobacco farmers to replace tobacco with solar farms in many places.

These (Aggressive) Newfound Ocean Viruses May Also Live in the Human Gut

Is the newly discovered, tailless Autolykiviridae virus shaping your microbiome?
Atacama Desert Solar Panels

China Denounces Coal, Chile Goes Solar, and Guinea Tackles Sleeping Sickness

Chile turned the Atacama Desert into a giant solar farm, China denounced coal power, and Guinea has been plagued by sleeping sickness.
Female chemist at work in laboratory.

Supermalaria, Disaster Testing, and a Drop in Antibiotics Use

A new drug-resistant malaria strain is spreading in South-East Asia. Farmers may be using fewer anti-biotics. Engineers are studying national disasters.
Sad tiger

Homeless Tigers, Suicidal Farmers, and Fish that Feed on Booze Waste

Meet fish that eat booze waste, learn about the homelessness crisis among Sumatra's tigers, and find out why American farmers are committing suicide.
Red London Double Decker Bus

Coffee-Powered Buses, Cannabis Megafarms, and a Fashionable Facelift

Britiain's red double-deckers will run on spent coffee grounds. California cannabis farms may now mushroom in size. Fashion is due for an ecological shift.
Rats are killing kiwis and other birds in New Zealand

Rat Wars, Radiation Leaks, and Other Dirty Secrets

This week in sustainability news: rats v. kiwis, radiation links in midcentury Soviet Union, and an American town with no running water.
Red Sea Coral Reef

Ecolabels, Plastic-Eating Corals, and Vanishing Cars

Are corals digesting plastic? Are gasoline cars about to disappear from our roads? Does the ecolabel on your frozen salmon mean your dinner is sustainable?

A Toast to Toilets!

Waterless toilets battle the global sanitation crisis.
Sad lovers couple after pregnancy test result

Are Our Environmental Policies Making Us Broke, Hungry, and Infertile?

Forestry wages fall, hunger is increases, and infertility may be growing because pesticide residue clings to food. Time to overhaul environmental policy?
Oil spill clean up worker

Epic Cleanups: Hurricane Sandy, Nuclear Waste, and Oil Spills

From oil spills to nuclear waste, humans are good at making epic messes. Sometimes we come up with clean up ideas and sometimes we neglect repairs entirely.
injection on raw chicken

Is Our Food Supply Toxic?

Yum. Scientists, policymakers, and journalists find that our food is polluted with pesticides, overdosed with antibiotics, and yet teeming with pathogens.
sulfur vent naples

Raging Seas, Blazing Smoke, and (Maybe) a Supervolcano

Have humans angered the planet? Smothering air pollution in California, rising seas in Oceania, and supervocanos that could cause global catastrophe.
Hypsilurus papuensis Papua Forest Dragon

Reptiles Need Your Love, Especially Now

A new study from Oxford and Tel Aviv universities found reptiles are underrepresented in conservation efforts, just in time for Reptile Awareness Day.
Indian Chicken Shop

Is Human Mistreatment of Animals Killing Our Planet?

Most people treat animals as tools for improving human lives. But recent reports reveal (mis)treatment of animals is harming the planet as a whole.
Mating Mallard Ducks

Unveiling Nature’s Mysteries: Mutant Sea Stars, Junk Jellyfish, and Duck Sex

Confront nature's mysteries, scientists find mutant sea stars surviving in warming waters and that sexual competition forces ducks to grow longer penises.
Scientists working in lab

To Save the Threatened, Scientists Clone Cacao, Fertilize Mollusks, and Hunt Porpoises

All over the world, researchers are trying to better understand a world in constant flux and to prevent species from extinction as they battle for survival.