Chautauqua

The Forgotten Movement That Changed American Women’s Lives

Chatauquas changed the lives of Midwestern women between 1878 and 1900, setting the stage for new gender roles in the twentieth century.
Sugar Beet Field

Did Youth Farming Programs Really Fight Juvenile Delinquency?

Summer jobs for teens are becoming a thing of the past, but considering these beet farm jobs, maybe we shouldn't romanticize them too much.
Oklahoma panhandle

Why Oklahoma Has a Panhandle

The long, strange story of why Oklahoma has that panhandle.
Bryan Sewall campaign poster

Populism for Beginners

If the appeal of Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, and Brexit can all be described as "populist," then what is populism?
Cormorants on a Guano Island

Are We Entering a New Golden Age of Guano?

A history of civilization could be written in fertilizers. And the history of guano—bird poop—tells us a lot about slavery, imperialism, and U.S. expansion.
Compost Heap

Should You Compost?

The science is clear: composting organic waste is good for the environment. 

Before Broadband, Seeking Universal Access to the Telephone

Today's debates about low-income subsidizes for broadband echo early fights for universal access to telephone lines.
Three generations of men on family farm

Our Farming Ancestors

While fewer farming family can be found today than many years ago, they still remain an important concept for any genealogist to understand.

Waking the Spirits: The Diaries of John A. Clark

During the fall and winter of 1861-1862, Clark and many other officials in Santa Fe attended at least eight séances.