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Based on a color lithograph of ca. 1826 by Anthony Imbert, entitled Shakers near Lebanon

The Rhythms of Shaker Dance Marked the Shakers as “Other”

The name Shaker originally comes from the insult “Shaking Quakers,” which mocked the sect’s use of their bodies in worship.

The Digital Voyage

A child and old man sitting at a table with their respective music technologies

The Importance of Technological Change in Shaping Generational Perspectives

If we name each generation based on the technological conditions it experienced, generations may soon encompass only a few years apiece.

Roundup

Back to School

Stories from JSTOR Daily about education, libraries, learning, and student life.

Cabinet of Curiosities

Elizabeth, Queen of Bohemia by Michiel Jansz. van Miereveldt

The Afterlife of Royal Hair

Whether worn as a lovelock or set in elaborate jewelry, the clipped-off hair of Kings and Queens outlived the monarchs themselves.

Suggested Readings

A sunset on the ocean with a red sky

1619, Woodstock, and the Origins of Life

Well-researched stories from The Guardian, Aeon, and other great publications that bridge the gap between news and scholarship.

Most Recent

Mouse embryo

Get Ready For Human-Animal Hybrids

New progress in stem-cell research raises some thorny ethical questions.
New Cider by Thomas Waterman Wood

The Ancient Roots of Apple Cider

Alcoholic apple cider has been around for centuries. So why does "hard cider" feel like a new trend?
A coffinette for the viscera of Tutankhamun

Was It Really a Mummy’s Curse?

A slew of mysterious deaths following the opening of King Tut's tomb prompted one epidemiologist to investigate.
George W. Bush, George H.W. Bush, Barbara Bush. Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton at at the National Cathedral in Washington, DC.

Why Did Christianity Thrive in the U.S.?

Between 1870 and 1960, Christianity declined dramatically across much of Europe. Not in America. One historian explains why.

More Stories

Long Reads

A camper van parked beside some trees in the fog

The New Nomads of #VanLife Reflect an Enduring Divide

A distinctly American restlessness is inspiring some to abandon the idea of a permanent home, while others are displaced by harsh realities.
Illustration of Ferdinand Magellan

The Pirate-y Life of Ferdinand Magellan

Magellan’s voyage in search of the “Spice Islands” was marked by storms, sharks, and scurvy—plus multiple attempts at mutiny.
Ralph H. Cameron in front of the Grand Canyon

The Man Who Tried to Claim the Grand Canyon

Ralph H. Cameron staked mining claims around the Grand Canyon, seeking to privatize it. When the federal government fought back, he ran for Senate.
A Shocking Announcement by Vittorio Reggianini

Why Do People Faint?

Fainting—or, more technically, syncope—has a variety of causes.

Teenagers who share work online often have a clear, specific idea of who they’re writing for.

Is Fan Fiction a Helpful Literacy Tool?

Ira Jackson pulls his boat through a flooded street September 5, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina

How Toxic Are Flood Waters?

While flood waters can be extremely polluted, researchers have found the lasting impact is different from what one might expect.
A person swimming near a coral reef

Can Eco-Tourism Save Coral Reefs?

Eco-tourism can be a boon—or an ecosystem destroyer.
Illustration of reservoir in Austrian mountains supplying water for storage in hydroelectric turbines

Renewable Resources Call For Increased Power Storage

Solar and wind power are great renewable options, but to store the energy that's produced, we're going to to need bigger batteries.