Mt. Ontake spews volcanic ash on September 28, 2014 in Otaki, Japan

After the Volcano Erupts

The catastrophic eruption of Japan’s Ontake-san allowed residents to reconsider and reinvent their relationships to the mountainous landscape.
An amazing looking super cell storm cloud forming on the east coast of Queensland, Australia.

Ecosystems and Extreme Weather Events

Cyclones, droughts, and other severe climate events produce a variety of ecological responses, some of them irreversible.
Plants and saplings growing in a previously logged area of a foggy forest in the Cascade Range of Oregon.

Reforestation: It’s A Trade-Off

While reforestation may help address the climate crisis, implementation requires long-term flexibility, careful listening, and an ability to compromise.
An electric car charges at a mall parking lot on June 27, 2022 in Corte Madera, California.

How Much Does It Cost to Reduce Carbon Emissions?

Analyses including both static and dynamic costs can help us make better decisions while developing technologies to address climate change.
Meji Jingu Shrine on December 15, 2012 in Tokyo, Japan

Sacred Trees in Japan

In the modern city of Tokyo, mature forests and trees form a spiritual bridge between past and present.
A White-crowned Sparrow

A Noisy City Affects Birdsong

As anthropogenic ambient noise increases in urban areas, birds adapt their songs to make themselves heard.
A no parking sign stands in the increased surf brought in by Tropical Storm Alberto June 13, 2006 in Cedar Key, Florida.

Improving Communications Around Climate Change

How can scientists better explain the potential hazards of sea-level rise to historic coastal communities?
Fish swimming in underwater kelp forest

Turf Algae and Kelp Forests

Structurally complex kelp forests, pushed beyond their tipping points, are being replaced by mat-like, low-structure turf algae around the world.
Photograph: NPS employee talking to visitors in the Tuolumme Meadows in Yosemite National Park.

Source:https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:HFCA_1607_NPS_Employees,_Women_512.jpg_(a3046c74ddc24fe6bc480fae94f4ce43).jpg

National Parks Are for Everyone

The majority of national park visitors—roughly seventy-eight percent—are white? Why, and why does that need to change?
Mono Lake

The Imperiled Inland Sea

Twenty years ago, scholar W. D. Williams predicted the loss of salt lakes around the world.