Nikita Khrushchev

The Power of Anecdotes in Politics

The Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev famously pounded his shoe at a United Nations meeting in 1960. Anecdotes of erratic behavior like this are unsettling.
Clinton Trump

When Does Truth Trump Bias?

In the wake of both national conventions, how do we find truth and how do journalists represent it without being too biased or too neutral?
Hulk Hogan (left) and Nick Denton (right)

How Hulk Hogan v. Gawker May Change the Face of Journalism

The recent Gawker vs. Hogan spat is the latest in the long history of journalism, free speech, gossip, and the law.
Credit: AP Photo/Alex Brandon

The Internet Didn’t Doom the Daily New Orleans Times-Picayune; Katrina Did

The Times-Picayune had no choice after Katrina but to publish primarily online.

Anonymity and Public Debate—in the 1800s

But 150 years ago in Great Britain, the question of what role anonymity should play in public discourse looked completely different than today.

Why Bias Helps News Channels—and Maybe Viewers Too

According to a 2005 paper about bias in newspapers, reporting that tries to play things straight down the middle isn't necessarily a winning move.

Privacy, Journalism, and the Gilded Age

The interview is now such a standard part of journalism that it may come as a surprise to read that the New York Times editorialized against it in 1874.

Nellie Bly, Girl Reporter

A look back on Nellie Bly and the era of "stunt-reporting."