1800s Chicago police

A History of Police Violence in Chicago

At the turn of the century, Chicago police killed 307 people, one in eighteen homicides in the city—three times the body count of local gangsters.
A dog on trial

When Societies Put Animals on Trial

Animal trials were of two kinds: (1) secular suits against individual creatures; and (2) ecclesiastic cases against groups of vermin.
Christy Matthewson

How Baseball Became a Profession

Sports historian Steven A. Riess writes that the process that transformed baseball into a high-paid profession began in the 1860s.
Declaration drafting

When Did Colonial America Gain Linguistic Independence?

By the time the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, did colonial Americans still sound like their British counterparts?
The Death of General Mercer at the Battle of Princeton, January 3, 1777

Immigration and National Security in George Washington’s Day

Presuming that immigration was a boon to national security, U.S. borders remained mostly open for the first century of the nation’s existence.
The English lion dismember'd or the voice of the public for an enquiry into the public expenditure.

Paper Money Rebellion

The Currency Act of 1764 returned the restrictions of 1751: banning colonists from printing their own legal tender bills.
Indenture certificate for James Rymer Junior, binding him as an apprentice to the surgeon-apothecaries Caleb Woodyer and William Newland of Guildford, signed by all parties.

Indentured Servants and The Domestic Economy

Many 18th-century households included not only relatives and slaves, but also indentured servants, people sold into bondage for a specified length of time.
"Hazelton coal miners". Licensed under Public Domain via <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hazelton_coal_miners.jpg#/media/File:Hazelton_coal_miners.jpg" target="_blank">Commons</a>

The Rise and Fall of Coal Miners’ Unions

The origin of coal miners' unions during the late 19th century.
circa 1955:  American humorist and author John Henry Faulk (1913 - 1990), narrates the history of early America in a still from the television program,'They Call It Folk Music.'  (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Hearing Harriet Smith

In the University of Texas library, our writer found a previously unknown audiotape of an interview with a woman who'd been born into slavery.
paper files

Population Studies for the Genealogist

Estimating the accuracy and depth of the records is just one insight genealogist's gain from population studies.