"Bundesarchiv Bild 102-00652, Richard Loeb und Nathan Leopold" by Bundesarchiv, Bild 102-00652 / CC-BY-SA. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 de via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_102-00652,_Richard_Loeb_und_Nathan_Leopold.jpg#/media/File:Bundesarchiv_Bild_102-00652,_Richard_Loeb_und_Nathan_Leopold.jpg

Leopold and Loeb, Again

The defense in the trail of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the Boston Marathon bombing is using Clarence Darrow's strategy in the Leopold and Loeb trial of 1924.
Lincoln's funeral in DC

Forgetting Abraham Lincoln

Sarah Browne’s neglect of Lincoln, compared with the ceaseless remembrance of her daughter, did not lessen her desolation over the assassination.
Hands on a computer keyboard

Obscenity and Unintended Consequences

In the Journal of American Studies, Amanda Frisken investigated how an earlier set of standards around obscenity emerged in the 1870s.
Senate Building in Washington, D.C.

The Logan Act

An old American Law, The Logan Act, has suddenly been thrust into the news.
Close-up of the Vietnam Memorial

The Vietnam War: 50 Years (and More) Later

The 50th anniversary of the vietnam war is somewhat misleading: The U.S. had been involved in Vietnam for well over a decade already by 1965
A stamp commemorating the Lincoln-Douglas Debates

Recording History: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858 are a touchstone of American history.

Carter G. Woodson, The Father of Black History Month

The origins of Black History Month date back to 1926, when a historian named Carter G. Woodson spearheaded “Negro History Week.”
A postcard of a Duluth lynching, June 15, 1920

Lynching in America

A new report called Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror," documents 3,959 African Americans lynched between 1877 and 1950.
Social Security cards and a sheet of budget numbers

Social Security at 75

The Social Security Act was signed into law in 1935.
Ghettoized book cover

Ghettoside: Murder & Justice in South LA

Detective Wallace “Wally” Tennelle was a rarity: a cop who actually lived in the South Los Angeles neighborhood where he worked.