Mount Everest North Face Tibet

How to Measure a Mountain

It’s not easy to measure a mountain. Mount Everest's height has been known since the middle of the nineteenth century, but how did they figure it out with no altimeters or GPS?

Fashion Forward: How Three Revolutionary Fabrics Are Greening the Industry

Kelp, yeast, and sequestered methane gas are on the forefront of the move to create environmentally friendly clothing
Female chemist at work in laboratory.

Supermalaria, Disaster Testing, and a Drop in Antibiotics Use

A new drug-resistant malaria strain is spreading in South-East Asia. Farmers may be using fewer anti-biotics. Engineers are studying national disasters.

Why We Need to Start Listening to Insects

The study of wingbeat has come an incredibly long way and could lead to breakthroughs crucial for human populations facing insect-borne disease and pests.
Cat playing Peek a Boo in a box

The Ig Nobels: The Lighter Side of Scientific Research

What exactly are the Ig Nobels? And what can we learn from the Journal of Irreproducible Results and the Annals of Improbable Results?
dead fish float in a polluted river

A Dead Fish “Vitamin Pill,” Microbes that Put Dinner on the Table, and a Truck that Runs On Cow Manure

From microbial biochemistry to recycling dead fish to manure-to-energy converters, here’s this week’s most surprising sustainability news.
Chili peppers

The Science of Hot Chili Peppers

Why do spicy foods feel hot? A look at the science behind the world's spiciest hot chili peppers, including the new "Dragon's Breath" variety.
Close-up of a pink octopus in the sea with a starfish

The Strange Genetic Trick of the Cephalopods

What makes cephalapods like octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish so intelligent? The answer might be in the way they can edit their own RNA as they go.