Heleno Bernardi art

Olympic Art: Mega Events and the Museum

Can the Olympics increase museum attendance in both the long and short-term? Carol Scott and her team proved just that in documenting Sydney's case study.
New York Dada

What Did Fashion Magazines Have To Do With Dada?

When you think of Dada, do you think of Europe? If so, you’re missing one of its hotbeds—New York.
Barbara Kruger

The History of “Your Body Is A Battleground”

Revisiting the iconic work of Barbara Kruger (“Your Body is a Battleground”) that has just as much resonance today as it did a quarter century ago.
Dürer's Rhinoceros

Dürer’s Rhinoceros and the Birth of Print Media

Dürer's image of a rhinoceros which drowned off Italy 500 years ago remains one of the world's most famous prints.

“The Culture of the Copy”: Victorians’ Obsession With Wax Flowers

Wax flowers were a major obsession of Victorian women, allowing them to combine art and industry.
President Barack Obama with Vice President Joe Biden place flowers down during their visit to a memorial to the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting, Thursday, June 16, 2016 in Orlando, Fla. Offering sympathy but no easy answers, Obama came to Orlando to try to console those mourning the deadliest shooting in modern U.S history. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Art and Symbolism of Mourning

In the wake of the Orlando massacre, how do we as a nation use art to help with healing and mourning?

Fridolatry: Frida Kahlo and Material Culture

Frida hats, and packs, and slacks, oh my! Frida Kahlo used material culture to construct her identity — and material culture made her an icon in return.

Cindy Sherman: Before the Selfie

Before cell phones and selfies, American artist Cindy Sherman influenced the world with her monumental and ongoing series of self-portraiture.
Snøhetta expansion of the new SFMOMA, 2016; photo © Henrik Kam, courtesy SFMOMA

SFMOMA: The Brave New World of Art Museums

SFMOMA celebrated its 75th anniversary with a huge architectural expansion, only rivaled by its technological innovations.
Paul Gauguin, Nafea Faa Ipoipo? (When Will You Marry? ) 1892, oil on canvas, 101 x 77 cm

The Real Reason Fine Art Costs So Much

To outsiders, art auctions can seem like a parody of bizarre spending by wealthy people. The origins of ultra-expensive art lies in the nineteenth-century.