JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

A New Novel Explores Art Theft, History, and Child Refugees

Ellen Umansky's novel The Fortunate Ones explores the psychological fallout of the World War II Kindertransport, which moved child refugees to England.
Cotton gin

Automation in the 1940s Cotton Fields

Automation is a bit of a Rorschach test for anyone interested in workers’ rights. In the 1940s, the mechanization of cotton farming changed the US economy.
Siege of Leningrad

The Nazis’ Nightmarish Plan to Starve the Soviet Union

Before the infamous Wannsee conference, Nazis had another meeting during which they planned the mass starvation of millions of Eastern Europeans.
Dresden Germany after firebombing

How Slaughterhouse-Five Made Us See the Dresden Bombing Differently

The bombing of Dresden, Germany, which began February 13, 1945, was once viewed as a historical footnote. Until Slaughterhouse-Five was published.
Anne Frank house bookcase

How the Netherlands Used Literature to Defy the Nazis

A new theory sheds light not only on the fate of the Franks, but on the extent of Dutch resistance to the Nazis.
USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor

Pearl Harbor at 75

Seventy-five years ago on the morning of December 7th, 1941, the Japanese attacked the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in the Hawaii Territory.
Polish refugees

Refugees Have Always Made Americans Nervous

What happens when a big stream of refugees enters an American community, bringing their foreign customs and values and taking scarce jobs?
French trench in WWI

The Power of Deterrence

The First World War witnessed the first major use of chemical warfare, but by the Second World War deterrence seemed to work. 

The Role of Female Pilots in Nazi Germany

German female pilots played an active role during World War II—acting as perpetrators and collaborators even as they broke barriers for women in flight.

How Hitler Played the American Press

Did the AP and other news organizations get tricked into sympathetic coverage of Hitler?