Bronte Sisters

Branwell: The Other Brontë

It's the 200th anniversary of the birth of Branwell Brontë, who isn't nearly as famous as his three sisters but remains a key player in the family drama.
Denis Johnson

Denis Johnson

Denis Johnson, author of Jesus' Son and other award-winning books, speaks with Eric Elshtain on the role of religion in his work.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Louise Erdrich

Friday Reads: An exclusive short story by Louise Erdrich (author of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry), originally published in The Georgia Review in 1985.
Lincoln Center trees

Speaking for the Trees

David George Haskell's book The Song of the Trees: Stories From Nature's Great Connectors, explores trees' connections with various communities.
Source: http://www.laurenhaldeman.com

Flannery O’Connor’s Moments of Grace

Flannery O'Connor employed grotesqueness and violence in her stories to illustrate the workings of grace on her characters.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

A New Novel Explores Art Theft, History, and Child Refugees

Ellen Umansky's novel The Fortunate Ones explores the psychological fallout of the World War II Kindertransport, which moved child refugees to England.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Elizabeth Bishop

Exploring the text and subtext of Elizabeth Bishop's poems, inspired by a new biography called Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Mary Shelley

Someone discovered a handful of previously unpublished letters written by Mary Shelley, stashed in private house in a small English village.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

A George Saunders Outtake

George Saunders' trademark dark humor is especially on display in this "deleted scene" from the novella Pastoralia, available for free here.
Herman Melville

Melville’s Confidence Man Today

Does Herman Melville's 1857 novel The Confidence-Man have anything to tell us about our present day? Philip Roth thinks so.