May is National Bike Month. To celebrate, we’re reprising some of our best content on the history of bicycles. Ride along with Buffalo Soldiers, the League of American Wheelmen, and other cycling enthusiasts.

Wheelmen

When Cyclists Made Up an Entire Political Bloc

The League of American Wheelmen was originally intended to spread bicycle appreciation. The 1896 presidential election changed all that.
Marshall "Major" Taylor

The Moral Threat of Bicycles in the 1890s

The bicycle craze of the 19th century, in which both men and women participated, was seen as a moral affront by church leaders. 
Troops of the 25th Infantry Bicycle Corps, Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument, 1896

Buffalo Soldiers and the Bicycle Corps

Buffalo Soldiers were assigned to assess bicycles as military transportation on the frontier at the end of the nineteenth century.
A recumbent bicycle in 1935

Who Killed the Recumbent Bicycle?

How a dominant technology became viewed as the only option, with no need for better-designed competitors.
Boy biking

How World War I Put Boys on Bikes

The first modern bicycles were for adults. Ads for boys’ bikes drew from, and fed into, a changing vision of boyhood during World War I.
Google's self-driving car

That Time a Self-Driving Car Stared Down a Cyclist

A cyclist in Austin, Texas had an awkward encounter with a Google self-driving car when he approached a 4-way stop at the same time as the vehicle.
Classic cars drive along dirt road in the mountains

The End of the Country Road

When “good roads” first became a political issue, rural people were decidedly not the ones advocating for them.
Print shows men and women riding bicycles and tricycles to a fair, 1819

Are Cyclists Reckless Lawbreakers?

Three researchers investigate whether bicyclists deserve their negative reputation.

Got a hot tip about an awesome bicycle story we should cover? Email us here.

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