A man on a laptop

Making Men Online

How the internet has both reinforced and tweaked traditional gender pathologies, especially for boys and men.
An illustration from War of the Worlds

What The War of the Worlds Had to Do with Tasmania

H.G. Wells's famous science fiction novel imagines what would happen if Martians did to Great Britain what Europeans did to Tasmania.
Close up of an eye

Finding a Murderer in a Victim’s Eye

In late 19th-century forensics, optography was all the rage. This pseudoscience held that what someone saw just before death would be imprinted on their eye.
Jordy Rosenberg

Queering Jack Sheppard

An interview with author Jordy Rosenberg about his new novel, Confessions of the Fox.
Twilight Zone spiral

Why We Still Love The Twilight Zone

Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone stood out in the "vast wasteland" of television in the early 1960s and still resonates today.
Ursula Le Guin

RIP Ursula K. Le Guin

"Isn't the 'subjection of women' in science fiction merely a symptom of a whole which is authoritarian, power-worshipping, and intensely parochial?"
BLADE RUNNER 2049

Do We Have Moral Obligations to Robots?

The recent film Blade Runner 2049 engages with questions raised by Karel Čapek and Isaac Asimov: What do we owe our creations (and what do they owe us)?
Tesla

Nikola Tesla and the Death Ray Craze

Nikola Tesla, the audacious futurist and groundbreaking inventor, once claimed to have invented a death ray that would end all war.
Flag of the Klingon Empire

Why We Love to Learn Klingon: The Art of Constructed Languages

Constructed languages like Klingon excite us because they enable us to actively participate in foreign or "alien" cultures. 
"FrankHerbert Dune 1st" by Digital scan of book cover from [1]; copyright maintained by publisher or artist, as applicable.. Via <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:FrankHerbert_Dune_1st.jpg#/media/File:FrankHerbert_Dune_1st.jpg" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a>

Dune at 50

Frank Herbert's novel Dune, the best selling science-fiction novel of all time, celebrates it's 50th birthday and is still read in innovative ways.