A 19th-century advertisement for Hood's Tooth Powder

How the Ban on Medical Advertising Hurt Women Doctors

Intended to protect consumers from unscrupulous quackery, a nineteenth-century ban on medical advertising proved to be a double-edged sword.
Mouse embryo

Get Ready For Human-Animal Hybrids

New progress in stem-cell research raises some thorny ethical questions.
An empty wheelchair

The Complicated Issue of Transableism

Some people born in able bodies feel as if they were meant to have disabilities. How should the medical community be responding?
Narayan and Iravati Lavate

The Mumbai Couple Suing for Their Right to Die

Eighty-seven-year-old Narayan Lavate, and his wife, Iravati, 78, say they are “leading unproductive and obsolete lives.”
Bioethics research hospital

Bioethics: Key Concepts and Research

Two experts in bioethics have curated a reading list of over 20 JSTOR sources on selected issues like: gene-editing, research and treatment, reproduction, disability, genetics, genealogy and race.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Infertility and The Art of Waiting

Our Friday Reads: a new book by Belle Boggs called The Art of Waiting.
Chekov

What Doctors Can Learn From the Arts

What can doctors learn from the arts? Ask Anton Chekhov.

The Lasting Fallout of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study

A new paper provides evidence that the Tuskegee Syphilis Study reduced the life expectancy of African-American men—though the Tuskegee Syphilis Study ...
Statue of James Marion Sims in New York's Central Park

Contested Memorials and the Mothers of Gynecology

Many have heard of Dr. James Marion Sims and know him as the “father of gynecology” but what about the “mothers of gynecology”? Where is their memorial?

The History of the Euthanasia Movement

The idea that death should be merciful is not new. Around 1800, pioneers of euthanasia pulled on the legs of those who'd been hanged to hasten their deaths.