Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts

The Madness of John Roberts

The Supreme Court's pro-choice decision in June Medical Services v. Russo illustrates the Chief Justice's embattled relationship with precedent.
An illustration of Charivari by Jean-Jacques Grandville, 1831

Ye Olde Morality-Enforcement Brigades

The charivari (or shivaree) was a ritual in which people on the lower rungs of a community called out neighbors who violated social and sexual norms.
A woman carries a baby wearing a protective mask as they exit the arrival hall at Hong Kong High Speed Rail Station on January 29, 2020 in Hong Kong, China.

The Law and Coronavirus

Can environmental law help contain viruses that spill over from animal to human populations?
Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 1977 ©Lynn Gilbert

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Radical Project Isn’t Finished

A fiery advocate against gender discrimination, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s radicalism reveals itself in her argument for the Equal Rights Amendment.
A jury box in a courtroom in Texas.

Why Do We Still Use Juries?

The history of juries is actually quite revolutionary.

Do We Have to Tell Them the House Is Haunted?

On the law and mythologies of haunting, from antiquity to today.
trial by combat

Trial by Combat? Trial by Cake!

The medieval tradition of deciding legal cases by appointing champions to fight to the death endured through 1817, unlike its tastier cousin.
Omega Nebula (M17)

The Bold Future of the Outer Space Treaty

With President Trump calling for a “Space Force” and private enterprise increasingly invested in space, what of the dream of international peace?

When FDR Tried to Pack the Courts

Pushing New Deal legislation, FDR proposed that extra justices should be added to the Supreme Court, one for every sitting justice over the age of seventy.
Blackberries

The Crucial Southern Blackberry

In the 19th century, blackberry picking was both hobby and money-making endeavor for many Americans. Increased regulation of land use changed all that.