Obama commencement speeches

Who Gets to Make Commencement Speeches (and Why)?

Why are battles over just who gets the honor of toasting new graduates—and what they say—always so heated?
technology gift

What Gift-Giving Research Tells Us About Giving Tech Gadgets

Whatever the gift, it’s worth stopping to think about how much we really want to entangle our gift-giving with the digital realm.
Roloff Family

Little People on TV: Educational or Exploitative?

Little people have been used for entertainment purposes in royal courts from ancient Egypt to medieval Europe. But can this be more than exploitative?
LGBTQ Pride Online

9 Reasons for the LGBTQ Community to Take Pride Online

Today, gay teens don't have to feel alone because the internet makes it possible to connect with other LGBTQ people all over the world. Right?
President Ronald Reagan at his desk in the Oval Office.

Why Ronald Reagan Became the Great Deregulator

How did deregulation, and related ideas about how to run the economy, become so central to American politics? Look to Reagan for the answer.
Close Up Of Pregnant Woman Smoking Cigarette

Addicted Mothers: Substance Abusers or Child Abusers?

Are mothers with addictions abusive or victims? Our answer almost always involves race and class.
Commencement vocab visualization

The Delightful Language of Commencement

Commencement speeches have inspired, motivated and captivated many. Just what makes the words found in them so wonderful and life-affirming? 
FDR delivers the nominating speech for Alfred E. Smith at the Democratic Convention at Madison Square Garden, New York, NY. June 26, 1924. This speech is often considered FDR's first major gesture of re-entry into national politics after recovering from the onset of polio.

A Really Contested Convention: The 1924 Democratic “Klanbake”

A "contested convention" maybe in the offing this July for the Democrats. Let's take a look at one of the most contested in American history, 1924.

When It Comes to Science, Scientists and the Public Diverge

Scientists and the public understand science topics quite differently, according to a new poll.

How the “Boomerang Generation” Sees Itself — and Adulthood

Researchers looked at young people's sense of their identity as adults after moving back home, with results published in Sociological Forum in 2008.