Jefferson Davis

What Is the Jefferson Davis Highway?

The Jefferson Davis Highway was project of the United Daughters of the Confederacy intended to portray Davis as an American hero.
Mad Magazine

How Mad Magazine Informed America’s Cultural Critique

When Tales Calculated to Drive You MAD—Humor in a Jugular Vein first erupted onto the streets in 1952, it was like nothing ever seen before.
WPA mural

What Kind of Work is “Masculine”?

What's the fate of "masculinity" in a world where it’s hard for many men to achieve personal success? It's a question we asked in the 1930s, too.
Untitled Basquiat

How Basquiat Went From Underrated to Record-Breaking

A 1982 Untitled work of Jean-Michel Basquiat broke records as the highest selling US-produced artwork. Learn how Basquiat and his work gained its fame.
Children behind barbed wire

How Photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White Showed Apartheid to Americans

Photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White dedicated her life to photography, including a trip to South Africa during the "dawn of the anti-apartheid era."
Nixon and JFK

Should Nixon Have Demanded a Recount?

A lot about the 2016 presidential election has been unprecedented, but this isn’t the first time we’ve seen calls for recounts in some states.
Twilight Zone the Hitchhiker

This Creepy Radio Broadcast Played With the Power of the Medium

Radio dramas became a way for broadcasters to get into the minds of listeners…and to comment on the very influence of radio itself.
Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015, following oral arguments in the Supreme Court in a case that could cut back on or even eliminate affirmative action in higher education. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The Case for Abigail Fisher: A History of Affirmative-Action Cases

Three affirmative-action cases set precedent for the Supreme Court as they make a decision on Fisher vs. University of Texas.
"MI Right-to-Work Protest - 11 December 2012 - crowd2" by File made available by Equality Michigan through the LGBT Free Media CollectiveEnglish | +/− - File made available by Equality Michigan through the LGBT Free Media CollectiveEnglish | +/−. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MI_Right-to-Work_Protest_-_11_December_2012_-_crowd2.jpeg#/media/File:MI_Right-to-Work_Protest_-_11_December_2012_-_crowd2.jpeg">Wikimedia Commons</a>

Scott Walker, The Koch Brothers, and the History of Right to Work Laws

The Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 gave states the ability to enact right to work laws, granting opponents of unions the ability to institute open-shop laws.

Why Antitrust Progressives Didn’t Curb the Power of Big Business

The limits of Progressive ideology in curbing antitrust practices in the U.S.