Skip to content
Nora McGreevy

Nora McGreevy

Nora McGreevy (she/her) is a freelance journalist based in Chicago, Illinois. She has written for Smithsonian magazine, Washingtonian, the Boston Globe, the South Bend Tribune and more. She can be reached through her website, noramcgreevy.com or through Twitter, @mcgreevynora.

Photograph: Chinese workers  on the Oregon and California Railroad, circa 1888.  

Source: Getty

The Chinese Exclusion Act: Annotated

The passing of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 marked the first time the United States prohibited immigration based on ethnicity and national origin.
Anna May Wong

Celebrating Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

Our best stories about the vast histories and cultures of Americans with ancestry in Asia and the Pacific.
Roman ivory doll from the mid-2nd century AD

Girls and Dolls in the Roman Empire

Analyzing the dolls of elite girls shows that playthings reinforced gendered expectations but also allowed for imaginative play.
Sofia, a skeleton from the Durankulak Necropolis

How the Gender Binary Limits Archaeological Study

One case study demonstrates how contemporary assumptions about gender in ancient societies risk obscuring the larger picture.
Family photo with Heinrich and Sophia Schliemann, 1871

Giving Overdue Credit to Early Archaeologists’ Wives

These women labored alongside their famous husbands to produce world-renowned research.
A man watches the CNN broadcast of the Osama bin Laden tape December 13, 2001 in a New York City store after it was released by the Pentagon.

How the Media Can Define Terrorism

Two scholars argue that the language used to describe violent events influences whether people see it as terrorism—with real-world consequences.
Photograph: Pro-Trump protesters gather in front of the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC

Source: Getty

Was the Capitol Attack Part of a New Wave of Terrorism?

A political scientist suggests that the right-wing violence of recent years might be a new current in a longer history.
The end of the "White Man's Rally" on November 1, 1898 in Wilmington, NC

How Racist Cartoons Helped Ignite a Massacre

In 1898, a North Carolina newspaper cartoonist weaponized white fears and tropes of Black predation to stoke a coup d'etat.