Doctor Death

Why Did the Plague Continue to Reemerge After the Middle Ages?

New research suggests alarming details about the plague, which repeatedly devastated populations across Europe, Asia, and Africa over the centuries. 
Eddie Aikau

Eddie Aikau: The Rad Life of a Hawaiian Surfing Legend

Eddie Aikau was a surfing legend during a time when Hawaiian legends were being resurrected. As a lifeguard, he attempted more than 500 daring rescues.
Marshall "Major" Taylor

The Moral Threat of Bicycles in the 1890s

The bicycle craze of the 19th century, in which both men and women participated, was seen as a moral affront by church leaders. 

The Perpetual Paranoid Style in American Politics

The "paranoid style" isn't so much periodical as it is perpetual. 
John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon and Barack Obama.

Looks Matter, Even in Politics

Research suggests that a candidate's looks play an integral part in whether they are electable or not.
Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia testifies before the House Judiciary Committee's Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee on Capitol Hill May 20, 2010 in Washington, DC.

How Supreme Court Nominations Became Political Battles

The battle to secure Supreme Court justices has a long and contentious history. 
Burning of Barges during Homestead Strike

Should Archivists Document Collective Memory?

Collective memory can be a useful addition to the documentation of history. 

Before Flint: How Americans Chose Lead Poisoning

The United States, unlike other Western nations, did not take a firm stance on lead-based products until much later--despite knowing the health risks. 
Minaret of Jam

Afghanistan’s Ancient and Beautiful Minaret of Jam

The Minaret of Jam, located in Afghanistan's Ghur province, provided a vantage point for the call to prayer. It remained hidden and forgotten until 1886.
Photograph of Septima Clark, ca. 1960, Avery Photo Collection, 10-9, Courtesy of the Avery Research Center.

How Septima Poinsette Clark Spoke Up for Civil Rights

The daughter of a slave, Septima Clark graduated from college, became a teacher, and became a fierce advocate for social and cultural change.