Graduates during commencement.

Does More Education Mean Higher Pay?

High school graduation rates sky-rocketed in the 1930s, but as more educated people flooded the job market, pay and opportunities plateaued. 
Sex Ed

The Battle Over Sex Ed in Anaheim in the 1960s

The fear of communism seemed inextricably tied to protests over Anaheim's sex ed program in the 1960s. 

How Schools Can Better Protect Athletes Suffering From Concussions

An estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur in the U.S. annually. Here are some tips schools can use to minimize its impact on students. 
Illustration of a homeless man.

Can Academics Help the Homeless?

Anthropologists have been studying the habits of the homeless to better understand and improve their condition and needs. 
College student at the library.

Universities Are Now Using Recruitment Videos to Attract Prospective Students

In this digital age, how do institutions of higher education engage prospects and get their messages out?
Students taking their SATs

Are We Witnessing the Death of the SAT?

Initially meant to test IQ, the SAT slowly proved to be an inefficient predictor of student success at the college-level.
Radcliffe Quad undergrad housing at Harvard University

Affirmative-Action for White Protestants

A different side to affirmative-action: How legacy admissions maintained white Protestant student enrollment at elite universities.
Abigail Fisher, who challenged the use of race in college admissions, joined by lawyer Edward Blum, right, speaks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 9, 2015, following oral arguments in the Supreme Court in a case that could cut back on or even eliminate affirmative action in higher education. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The Case for Abigail Fisher: A History of Affirmative-Action Cases

Three affirmative-action cases set precedent for the Supreme Court as they make a decision on Fisher vs. University of Texas.
Lincoln University graduate Lloyd L. Gaines, 24 years old, during the mandamus suit trial in which he is seeking to compel the University of Missouri to admit him as a law student. (Copyright Bettmann/Corbis / AP Images)

Desegregating Mizzou

It took twelve years and the Supreme Court before the University of Missouri agreed to accept black students.