Dürer's Rhinoceros

Dürer’s Rhinoceros and the Birth of Print Media

Dürer's image of a rhinoceros which drowned off Italy 500 years ago remains one of the world's most famous prints.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Video Games, Italian Revolutionaries, and Anne Tyler

Our Friday Reads are these new books out this week, and related content you won't find anywhere else.

“The Culture of the Copy”: Victorians’ Obsession With Wax Flowers

Wax flowers were a major obsession of Victorian women, allowing them to combine art and industry.
President Barack Obama with Vice President Joe Biden place flowers down during their visit to a memorial to the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting, Thursday, June 16, 2016 in Orlando, Fla. Offering sympathy but no easy answers, Obama came to Orlando to try to console those mourning the deadliest shooting in modern U.S history. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Art and Symbolism of Mourning

In the wake of the Orlando massacre, how do we as a nation use art to help with healing and mourning?
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Tig Notaro, Annie Proulx, and More

Our Friday Reads rounds up five new books out this week, and links to related content you won't find anywhere else. 

Fridolatry: Frida Kahlo and Material Culture

Frida hats, and packs, and slacks, oh my! Frida Kahlo used material culture to construct her identity — and material culture made her an icon in return.

A Bloomsday Remembrance of James Joyce

June 16th is Bloomsday, the day on which James Joyce's sprawling Modernist novel Ulysses takes place. Celebrate literature, Dublin, and, well, pubs!

The Deafening (((Echoes))) of Marked Language

What is marked language, and what does it have to do with the online hate speech of anti-semitic "Echoes" on Twitter?

How Plato Anticipated Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone" would not have surprised Plato. 
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Friday Reads in the Digital Library

Here is your Friday Five: Five new books out this week, and links to related content you won't find anywhere else. Ghanaian-American writer Yaa Gyasi’s firs