Courtesy Azusa Pacific University Special Collections via <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32623441">JSTOR</a>

Orange Crate Art

California citrus growers drew on mass-printing techniques and advances in color lithography to create distinctive brands for their boxes.
Rosa Bonheur in her atelier (1893) by Georges Achille-Fould

Rosa Bonheur’s Permission to Wear Pants

One of the few women permitted to wear trousers during the Third Republic, the French artist developed a sense of self through her clothing choices.
Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror by Parmigianino

The New York School Poets

From Bernadette Mayer to Joan Mitchell. Tracing the path from the New York School poets to their painter friends.
Marie Antoinette by Marie Louise Élisabeth Vigée-Le Brun

The Drama of Point d’Alençon Needle Lace

In its heyday, lace was beautiful, expensive, and handmade. Naturally, lace smuggling became the stuff of legend.

Message in a Button

A dive into the the University of Connecticut Pins and Button Collection gives a wearable history of progressive causes.
Painting of a woman's hand holding a pomegranate

The Paradoxical Pomegranate

Aphrodisiac and contraceptive, enflaming and cooling, the pomegranate was a balancing act, mediating between opposing states.
Mario Montez

How Latin Camp Rocked the New York Underground

Puerto Rican queers produced theater and film that made them mainstays of the New York underground arts movement of the 1950s and ’60s.
A reliquary shrine attributed to Jean de Touyl, ca. 1325-50

What’s in the Box? The Art of Reliquaries

The cult of relics dates back to the second and third centuries, when Christian martyrs were often killed in ways that fragmented the body.
Photograph: Two people dancing, photographed by David Schwartz, Albright College. Part of Albright College's Nicaragua Revolution: David Schwartz Collection

Source: https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.20472290

Eight Open Collections Perfect for Hispanic Heritage Month

Freely available images and other primary source materials from the JSTOR Open Community Collections and Artstor Public Collections.

The Unicorns of JSTOR

These rare creatures have by turn—and somewhat paradoxically—been associated with purity, fertility, seduction, healing, sacrifice, immortality, and divinity.