Central European History is published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Conference Group for Central European History of the American Historical Association. The journal was first issued in 1968, and as the title might suggest, it is geared toward scholars of the history of Central Europe. However, the journal covers a broad scholarly base, as it encourages an approach to history from a number of interdisciplinary perspectives, keeping the content fresh and fast-paced. Though much Central European historical scholarship deals with the post-WWII and post-Berlin Wall eras, the journal has published articles that deal with far less modern time periods, especially the medieval era.

Here are some of my favorites from Central European History:

The Politics of Rationing Food in Post-World War II Germany
Grams, Calories, and Food: Languages of Victimization, Entitlement, and Human Rights in Occupied Germany, 1945–1949

Uncovering the little-known history of Otto von Bismarck’s private assets
Bismarck’s Fortune

Understanding the role of Napoleon as the primary force that drove German modernization 
The French Revolution and the Modernization of Germany

Determining women’s legitimacy as mediators of God’s word in 17th Century Germany
God, the Devil, Medicine, and the Word: A Controversy over Ecstatic Women in Protestant Middle Germany 1691-1693

 

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