Hidden Gems of the JSTOR Archive: Cinema Journal

Cinema Journal is one of the top journals in the field of media studies. Published quarterly by the University of Texas Press on behalf of the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, the first issue was released in 1966. With a broad focus in radio, film, television and other forms of media, this journal has immense and diversified content, with topics ranging from exploitation in film to the importance of sound track albums. By welcoming submissions from all areas of humanities in relation to media studies, Cinema Journal’s pieces are always refreshing and addictive to read. Furthermore, despite its wide range, each issue still includes in-depth essays that engage the reader.

Here are some of my favorites that will get you hooked:

The Clothes Make the Fan: Fashion and Online Fandom When “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” Goes to eBay
The price of selling wardrobe items was bigger than they thought.

“Too Close for Comfort”: “American Beauty” and the Incest Motif
An examination of incest in one of the most applauded movies in history

Should Fan Fiction Be Free?
Commercialization of fan fiction leads to serious implications.

Blaxploitation Horror Films:”Too Close for Comfort”: “American Beauty” and the Incest Motif Reappropriation or Reinscription?
Were blaxploitation films actually an outlet to criticize general racism?


JSTOR Citations

"Too Close for Comfort": "American Beauty" and the Incest Motif

By: Kathleen Rowe Karlyn

Cinema Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1 (Autumn, 2004), pp. 69-93

Published by: University of Texas Press on behalf of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies

The Clothes Make the Fan: Fashion and Online Fandom When "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" Goes to eBay

By: Josh Stenger

Cinema Journal, Vol. 45, No. 4 (Summer, 2006), pp. 26-44

Published by: University of Texas Press on behalf of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies

Should Fan Fiction Be Free?

By: Abigail De Kosnik

Cinema Journal, Vol. 48, No. 4 (Summer, 2009), pp. 118-124

Published by: University of Texas Press on behalf of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies

Blaxploitation Horror Films: Generic Reappropriation or Reinscription?

By: Harry M. Benshoff

Cinema Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Winter, 2000), pp. 31-50

Published by: University of Texas Press on behalf of the Society for Cinema & Media Studies

Steven Huynh served as the editorial and marketing intern at JSTOR Daily in the summer of 2015.

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