Courtesy of D. Joshua Taylor

The Influenza Epidemic of 1918 and Your Ancestors

The Influenza Epidemic of 1918 was a global catastrophe that is estimated to have killed between 40 and 50 million people.

Historian Elizabeth A. Fenn on the Mandans

Early work from historian Elizabeth A. Fenn.
gravestone

The Genealogy Factor: Graveyards & Gravestones

This is the first in a series of columns by Genealogy Roadshow host Josh Taylor about doing genealogical research on JSTOR.

Privies: Vaults of the Past

Privies were the standard urban and rural toilet right into the 20th century in the U.S.

Dispatches From the Beginning of Women’s History

The origins of Women's History Month.
Female prisoners at Parchman sewing, c. 1930 
By Mississippi Department of Archives and History [see page for license], via Wikimedia Commons

A History of Women’s Prisons

While women's prisons historically emphasized the virtues of traditional femininity, the conditions of these prisons were abominable.
Close-up of "Just Married" sign attached on convertible car's trunk. Horizontal shot.

A Threat to “Traditional Marriage” in the 1920s

The view of "traditional marriage" has been under attack since long before anyone imagined state-sanctioned gay and lesbian unions

A Cultural History of Satirical Cartoons and Censorship

Articles in JSTOR illuminate the long history of satirical cartoons and censorship.

Martin Luther King, Jr And The Paradox of Nonviolence

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Nobel Peace Prize was controversial–and that the controversy had nothing to do with his age.

The Italian-American Immigration Experience

As President Obama prepares to move forward on immigration reform, the debate over the role of immigrants in US society is ramping up.