In some ways, the entire mission of JSTOR Daily is about media literacy. Our goal is to provide scholarly context to the news using the methodical thinking that goes into careful research. Any story you read on the site does this work, which becomes more important as disinformation circulates on the internet. That said, the following stories take “fake news” and media literacy head on, suggesting lessons from the past and steps we can take now to educate ourselves and our students about how to be thoughtful consumers of information.

An elderly man typing on a laptop

To Fight Fake News, Broaden Your Social Circle

Fake news is spread through online communities that become echo-chambers of like-minded ideas. What's your online community like?

Four Hard Truths about Fake News

Skeptical, self-aware interaction with digital data is the critical foundation upon which democracy may be maintained, explains media scholar Alexandra Juhasz.
A man reading a newspaper with facebook reactions in a cloud around him

The Incredibly True Story of Fake Headlines

Are you still reading? Editors frequently use this space to include important contextual information about a news story.
New York Journal 1898

To Fix Fake News, Look To Yellow Journalism

Fake news has plenty of precedents in the history of mass media, and particularly, in the history of American journalism.
A woman reading a newspaper

To Predict the Role of Fake News in 2020, Look to Canada

Canada has taken steps to address the potential for online misinformation ("fake news") in its upcoming election, but the internet changes rapidly.
Murió la Verdad (The Death of Truth)

The Collapse of Meaning in a Post-Truth World

2016 was certainly an unstable time in history. Even the way we use language to convey our collective fears about the state of society seems fractured.
Clinton Trump

When Does Truth Trump Bias?

In the wake of both national conventions, how do we find truth and how do journalists represent it without being too biased or too neutral?
Two young people reading together.

Is Fan Fiction a Helpful Literacy Tool?

Some teachers are adapting to the internet age by trying to understand the "new literacies" of today's students.
Eugène Durieu - Female portrait

Visual Literacy in the Age of Open Content

We need a visual literacy to help us negotiate new ways of seeing, but also new ways of accessing, manipulating, and reusing visual content.

Why Bias Helps News Channels—and Maybe Viewers Too

According to a 2005 paper about bias in newspapers, reporting that tries to play things straight down the middle isn't necessarily a winning move.

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