a globe surrounded by symbols of faith

Come Let Us Argue: Faith and Intellectual Humility

Can belief in the divine endure in an individual who possesses an openness to being wrong? How do doubt and faith co-exist among the religious?
Father talking to son at a workbench in the home

How Hobbies Changed the Home

Basements, sheds, and workshops found their way into American homes because leisure activities pursued by men and boys were often loud and smelly.
An illustration of a hand holding a set of hand cuffs

A True Crime Syllabus

How did we become so obsessed with “true crime”? This multidisciplinary syllabus shows how we view crime as a whole and how those views have changed over time.
La Befana by Bartolomeo Pinelli, 1821

A Visit from La Befana

In the Catholic tradition, Epiphany is the day the Three Kings first met Baby Jesus. But in Italy, it’s also the day La Befana shows up with a basket of gifts.
Photographs of white snowflakes on a dark blue background.

Winter Holidays

Celebrate with some seasonal scholarship from JSTOR Daily for the winter holidays.
Aerial view of Darwin, Australia

Darwin Down Under

The largest town in Australia’s Northern Territory, Darwin offers beautiful beaches, historic seaside festivals, and some tough socioeconomic problems.
Young friends studying on laptop together in living room

Teaching Summary Skills with JSTOR Daily

Helping students to summarize scholarly works starts with getting them to ask the right questions about the material and the purpose of the exercise.
A cartoon illustration of an elderly woman communicating on the internet

I Hope This Finds You Well, or, Dude, You Good?

Are formulaic hoping and wishing statements in correspondence evidence of magical thinking?
Top portion of a "Letter from Heaven," produced in England, 18th century

Himmelsbriefe: Heaven-Sent Chain Letters

For more than a thousand years, people have used letters allegedly written by Christ as both doctrinal evidence and magical charms.
The School of Athens (detail) featuring Euclid by Raphael

Data: Not Just Another Four-Letter Word

For early modern theologians, data were assumptions of truths for which there was no need for explanation. How things—and data—have changed.