Dennis Franz and Rick Schroder in "NYPD Blue," 1998

Cop Shows, COVID Design, and Ancient Plague

Well-researched stories from The Conversation, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications that bridge the gap between news and scholarship.
A man nursing a sick person, circa 1850

Blaming People for Getting Sick Has a Long History

Four major theories of disease transmission dominated scientific discourse in the nineteenth century. As one scholar writes, all were political.
From the video game State of Decay

The Therapeutic Value of Horror Video Games

In stressful situations, seeking out even more stress can be cathartic.
Several hundred doctors, nurses and medical professionals come together to protest against police brutality and the death of George Floyd on June 5, 2020 in St Louis, Missouri.

Police Violence Is a Public Health Issue

Research makes the case that people who fear police violence are less likely to seek out health care.
Anita Louise chats on the telephone in a scene from The Gay Lady, 1935

When the Telephone Was Considered Feminine

Being difficult to understand on the other end of the line was a badge of masculinity.
A woman speaking on the phone

Calling the Police, without Trusting the Police

A scholar finds nuanced reasoning among poor Black women facing difficult choices about whether to call the cops.
A chicken surrounded by chicks

So You Want to Buy a Pet Chicken?

Looking for a sense of comfort and security by buying a chicken? You'll get more than you bargained for.
James Baldwin

LGBTQ Pride Month

June is LGBTQ Pride Month, so JSTOR Daily gathered some of our favorite stories to celebrate. All with free and accessible scholarly research.
James Baldwin and Nikki Giovanni on SOUL!, 1971

James Baldwin and Nikki Giovanni in Conversation

In 1971, two legends of Black letters discussed Black manhood, white racism, the role of the writer, and the responsibility to teach.
Nikolai Vavilov in prison

The Weed Scientist Who Brought Down the Wrath of Stalin

Nikolai Ivanovich Vavilov's hypothesis on the evolution of rye is now accepted. But in the 1930s, his research got him arrested.