Little Women

Did Victorians Really Get Brain Fever?

The melodramatic descriptions of "fevers" in old novels reveal just how frightening the time before modern medicine must have been.
Source: http://www.laurenhaldeman.com

Flannery O’Connor’s Moments of Grace

Flannery O'Connor employed grotesqueness and violence in her stories to illustrate the workings of grace on her characters.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Kathleen Rooney’s Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk

Move over flâneur, here comes the flâneuse, the female version of the famous French walkers.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

A New Novel Explores Art Theft, History, and Child Refugees

Ellen Umansky's novel The Fortunate Ones explores the psychological fallout of the World War II Kindertransport, which moved child refugees to England.
talk therapy

When Language Can Cure What Ails You

Healthy talk is often promoted as the way for us to become even better humans. But is talking about our health always a key to actual better health?
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Elizabeth Bishop

Exploring the text and subtext of Elizabeth Bishop's poems, inspired by a new biography called Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Mary Shelley

Someone discovered a handful of previously unpublished letters written by Mary Shelley, stashed in private house in a small English village.
Trump mouth

The Language Wars

As a society becomes increasingly unstable, linguistic innovation happens more rapidly.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

A George Saunders Outtake

George Saunders' trademark dark humor is especially on display in this "deleted scene" from the novella Pastoralia, available for free here.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Kathleen Collins and Black Women’s Sexuality

A new book is getting a lot of attention in the literary world right now…although its author died ...