Mam-speaking women drink coffee after a group meeting on February 12, 2017 in Cajola, Guatemala

The Mam In Oregon

Guatemalan immigrants, bringing with them unique skills and knowledge, are adapting to their new homes and communities in the Pacific Northwest.
Dakota pipeline protestors

Celebrating Indigenous Peoples and Cultures

More and more states are choosing to celebrate Indigenous Peoples' Day instead of Columbus Day.
Portrait of Frances Theresa Stuart, Duchess of Richmond and Lennox by Peter Lely, 1662

The Woman Famous for Not Sleeping With a King

As a lady-in-waiting to the Queen of England, Frances Stuart was known as much for her ability to fend off the advances of King Charles II as for her beauty.
Igbo women

Women Leaders in Africa: The Case of the Igbo

In the precolonial Igbo states of West Africa, power was often wielded by male chiefs or elders, but women had their own forms of authority as well. 
King Charles III and Camilla, Queen Consort take part in an address in Westminster Hall on September 12, 2022 in London, England.

Royal Succession, Reformed

British history is witness to a long struggle to curtail the power of monarchs and redefine the regulations governing succession to the throne.
The Rosetta Stone

Jean-François Champollion Deciphers the Rosetta Stone

On September 27, 1822, the French philologist announced that he’d decrypted the key that would unlock Egypt’s ancient past.
The destruction of Smyrna

September 1922: The Great Fire of Smyrna

A hundred years after the cosmopolitan city burnt to the ground, the truth about who started the fire and why remains a point of contention.
Bessie Beatty

Woman on a Mission

For pioneering journalist Bessie Beatty, women’s suffrage and the plight of labor were linked inextricably.
Lady Arbella Stuart

The Lady Who Might Have Been Queen of England

The failed campaign to put Lady Arbella Stuart in the line of succession began with a matchmaking scheme between her two grandmothers.
Royal Air Force bombers, 1938

The RAF on Speed: High-Flying or Flying High?

Drug use during World War II, especially by Nazis, was typically viewed as immoral. But what about when it was approved by leaders of the Royal Air Force?