A model showing the layers of Earth

The Woman Who Found the Earth’s Inner Core

Inge Lehmann was the seismologist and mathematician who figured out what the Earth's core was actually made of.
Poster for Women's Day, March 8, 1914, demanding voting rights for women.

The Socialist Origins of International Women’s Day

Why is International Women's Day on March 8th? The answer is much more complicated than you might think.

Celebrating Women’s History Month

Celebrate Women's History Month all March with JSTOR Daily. We hope you'll find the stories below, and the scholarship they include in full, a valuable resource for classroom or leisure reading.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Elizabeth Bishop

Exploring the text and subtext of Elizabeth Bishop's poems, inspired by a new biography called Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast.
JSTOR Daily Friday Reads

Mary Shelley

Someone discovered a handful of previously unpublished letters written by Mary Shelley, stashed in private house in a small English village.
Mary Somerville

Mary Somerville, Queen of 19th Century Science

Mary Somerville, one of the first women scientists and science writers, came to be known after her death as the "queen of 19th century science." 
A box of antique jewelry.

What Love Tokens Can Tell Us About Poor Women in Early Modern England

Poor English women imbued everyday objects with an emotional power that they gave and received. These were known as love tokens. 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning Was Both a Celebrity and a Superfan

As celebrity culture developed in 19th century England, authors were at turns celebrated and celebrators of artists they admired. 
Mug shot taken in 1901 when Goldman was implicated in the assassination of President McKinley

From Enemy to Icon: The Life of Emma Goldman

While alive, Emma Goldman was considered an enemy of the state. In death, she became a celebrated American icon. 
Female dentist with patient, 1960.

How Women Dentists Were Perceived in the 1960s

A look at how women dentists were perceived in the 1960s, emphasizing the overall professional entrance of women in the workplace.