Grandchildren of slaves.

How an Ex-Slave Successfully Won a Case for Reparations in 1783

In one of the earliest examples of reparations, an ex-slave named Belinda petitioned the government and was granted an annuity.
It is the bean, that we mean, so white and lean.

What It Was Like To Be an African-American Soldier During the Civil War

What was it like to be one of the 186,017 African Americans who served in the Union Army during the Civil War?
A sleeping car porter employed by the Pullman Company at Union Station in Chicago, Illinois.

The Historic Achievement of the Pullman Porter’s Union

The achievements of the Pullman Porter's Union were a significant civil rights victory for both U.S. labor and the civil liberties of African-Americans. 
The road to liberty; a station on the Underground Railroad.

The Secret Order Behind the Underground Railroad

William Lambert and George De Baptiste, free-born black men, used the underground railroad to help slaves escape to British Canada. 
Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King.

By Herman Hiller / New York World-Telegram & Sun, Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Ronald Reagan and the Rewriting of Martin Luther King’s Legacy

Ronald Reagan invoked Dr. King's legacy to fit with his larger political and rhetorical aims. 
Children playing at the St. Francis Square Housing Development Play Center

St. Francis Square: How a Union Built Integrated, Affordable Housing in San Francisco

How a union built integrated affordable housing in early 1960s San Francisco.
John Hope Franklin, who heads President Clinton's Commission on Race Relations, works with orchids in his backyard greenhouse, in Durham, N.C., on Aug. 25, 1997. (AP Photo/Grant Halverson)

Remembering John Hope Franklin

A celebration of the centenary of historian John Hope Franklin.
Presidential portrait of Woodrow Wilson

Understanding Woodrow Wilson’s Racism

Woodrow Wilson's racism was of its time, and so were critiques of it by the likes of political ally turned critic, W.E.B. Du Bois.
Lincoln University graduate Lloyd L. Gaines, 24 years old, during the mandamus suit trial in which he is seeking to compel the University of Missouri to admit him as a law student. (Copyright Bettmann/Corbis / AP Images)

Desegregating Mizzou

It took twelve years and the Supreme Court before the University of Missouri agreed to accept black students.
Prison Cell

The Return of Debtors’ Prisons

New lawsuits allege that court officials are jailing people who fall behind on payment of court fees and fines, leading to a resurgence of debtors' prisons.